9 Monuments in Berlin that you should visit - With photos & details

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9 Monuments to explore in Berlin

Capital and largest city of Germany by both area and population. Berlin is a world city of culture, politics, media and sciences, and its economy is based on high-tech firms and the service sector, encompassing a diverse range of creative industries, research facilities, media corporations and convention venues.

Berlin CathedralAm Lustgarten, 10178 Berlin, Germany

One of the main landmarks in Berlin’s cityscape. The church's interior is filled with elaborate decorative and ornamental designs. The crypt here is the most important dynastic sepulchre in Germany. It contains nearly 100 sarcophagi and burial monuments from five centuries.

Berlin Wall MemorialBernauer Str. 111, 13355 Berlin, Germany

Commemorates the division of Berlin by the Berlin Wall and the deaths that occurred there. The monument includes a Chapel of Reconciliation, the Berlin Wall Documentation Centre, and a 60-meter (200 ft) section of the former border as it was when the Wall fell, a window of remembrance and a visitor center.

Brandenburg GatePariser Platz, 10117 Berlin, Germany

One of the most iconic monuments of Germany. Built on a former city gate that marked the start of the road from Berlin to the town of Brandenburg an der Havel, which used to be capital of the Margraviate of Brandenburg- a major principality of the Holy Roman Empire that played a pivotal role in the history of Germany and Central Europe. Throughout its existence, the Brandenburg Gate was often a site for major historical events.

Checkpoint CharlieFriedrichstraße 43-45, 10117 Berlin, Germany

Name given by the Western Allies to the best-known Berlin Wall crossing point between East Berlin and West Berlin during the Cold War (1947–1991). It is a symbol of the Cold War, representing the separation of East and West.

Glienicke BridgeKönigstraße, 14109 Berlin, Germany

The Glienicke Bridge stands across the Havel River in Germany, connecting Berlin with Potsdam. It is named after nearby Glienicke Palace. The current bridge, the fourth on the site, was completed in 1907. During the Cold War, this portion of the Havel River formed the border between West Berlin and East Germany. The bridge was used several times for the exchange of captured spies and thus became known as the Bridge of Spies.

Neue WacheUnter den Linden 4, 10117 Berlin, Germany

A memorial for the victims of war and dictatorship. The sculpture in the memorial is an enlarged version of Käthe Kollwitz's "Mother with her Dead Son". The sculpture is directly placed under the oculus, and so is exposed to the rain, snow, and cold of the Berlin climate, symbolizing the suffering of civilians during World War II.

Pergamon MuseumBodestraße 1-3, 10178 Berlin, Germany

One of the most visited art museums in Germany housing large monumental buildings such as the Pergamon Altar, Ishtar Gate of Babylon, the Market Gate of Miletus etc..

Reichstag BuildingPlatz der Republik 1, 11011 Berlin, Germany

The meeting place of the German parliament. It was opened in 1894 and housed the parliment of German Empire until 1933, when it was severely damaged after being set on fire. The ruined building was partially refurbished in the 1960s, but a full restoration was made after German reunification on 3 October 1990. the restoration was completed in 1999.

Victory ColumnGroßer Stern, 10557 Berlin, Germany

Designed after 1864 to commemorate the Prussian victory in the Danish-Prussian War. When it was inaugurated on 2 September 1873, Prussia had also defeated Austria and its German allies in the Austro-Prussian War (1866) and France in the Franco-Prussian War (1870–71), giving the statue a new purpose. These later victories inspired the addition of the bronze sculpture of Victoria, 8.3 metres (27 ft) high and weighing 35 tonnes.