14 Viewpoints in United Kingdom that you should visit - With photos & details

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14 Viewpoints to explore in United Kingdom

The United Kingdom consists of four constituent countries: England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland. It is the sixth-largest economy by nominal GDP and ninth-largest economy by purchasing power parity. It has a high-income economy and has a very high Human Development Index rating, ranking 14th in the world. It was the world's first industrialised country and the world's foremost power during the 19th and early 20th centuries.

Aonach Eagach RidgeBallachulish PH49 4HX, UK

The Aonach Eagach is a rocky ridge lying to the north of Glen Coe in the Scottish Highlands. The full ridge continues for 10 km from the Pap of Glencoe at the west to the eastern end at the Devil's Staircase. The central section, some 2 km in length, is very rocky and the route along it requires scrambling ability. The slopes to each side are extremely dangerous, with steep grass and scree slopes hiding even steeper slopes which end in cliffs on both north and south sides of the ridge.

Ardvreck CastleLairg IV27 4HL, UK

Ardvreck Castle is a ruined castle dating from the 16th century which stands on a rocky promontory jutting out into lake Assynt in Sutherland, Scotland. The castle was built in about 1590, Ardvreck is famous as the place where Montrose- viceroy and captain general of Scotland was handed over in 1650 to the Covenanter forces by MacLeod, Laird of Assynt.

Bealach na Ba (Pass of the Cattle)Strathcarron IV54 8ND, UK

Bealach na Bà is a winding single track road through the mountains of the Applecross peninsula, in Wester Ross in the Scottish Highlands. The historic mountain pass was built in 1822 and is engineered similarly to roads through the great mountain passes in the Alps, with very tight hairpin bends that switch back and forth up the hillside and gradients that approach 20%. The name is Scottish Gaelic for Pass of the Cattle, as it was historically used as a drovers' road.

Ben NevisBen Nevis, Fort William PH33 6SY, UK

Ben Nevis is the highest mountain in the British Isles, the United Kingdom, Great Britain, Scotland. The summit is 1,345 meters (4,413 ft) above sea level and is the highest land in any direction for 459 miles (739 km). The mountain is a popular destination, attracting an estimated 100,000 ascents a year. The summit, which is the collapsed dome of an ancient volcano, features the ruins of an observatory which was operational between 1883 and 1904.

Cape WrathBraemar, Lairg IV27 4PZ, UK

Cape Wrath is the most north-westerly point in mainland Britain. The cape is separated from the rest of the mainland by the Kyle of Durness inlet and consists of 107 square miles (280 square kilometres) of moorland wilderness known as the Parph. The first road was built in 1828 by the lighthouse commission across the Parph/Durness. This road connects a passenger ferry that crosses the Kyle of Durness with the buildings on the peninsula.

Castle Sinclair GirnigoeWick KW1 4QT, UK

Castle Sinclair Girnigoe is located about 3 miles north of Wick on the east coast of Caithness, Scotland. It is considered to be one of the earliest seats of Clan Sinclair. It comprises the ruins of two castles: the 15th-century Castle Girnigoe; and the early 17th-century Castle Sinclair. The ruins sits upon a rocky promontory jutting out into Sinclair Bay.

Chanonry PointFortrose IV10 8SD, UK

Chanonry Point lies at the end of Chanonry Ness, a spit of land extending into the Moray Firth. It is one of the best spots in the UK to view bottlenose dolphins from the land. The dolphins are often visible off Chanonry point, particularly on an incoming tide when they play and fish in the strong currents. An active lighthouse is also situated at the tip of the point.

Duncansby HeadWick KW1 4YS, UK

Duncansby Head is the most northeasterly part of the British mainland. The point is marked by Duncansby Head Lighthouse, and Duncansby Stacks, prominent sea stacks just off the coast.

Glen NevisGlen Nevis, Fort William PH33, UK

Glen Nevis is a valley in Lochaber, Highland, Scotland, with Fort William at its foot. It is bordered to the south by the Mamore range, and to the north by the highest mountains in the British Isles: Ben Nevis, Càrn Mor Dearg, Aonach Mòr, and Aonach Beag. It is home to one of the three highest waterfalls in Scotland, Steall Falls. Several films have been shot in Glen Nevis, most notably in the Harry Potter movies, Highlander, Highlander III: The Sorcerer, Braveheart and Rob Roy.

Glenfinnan ViaductA830 Rd, Glenfinnan PH37 4LT, UK

A railway viaduct on the West Highland Line. The viaduct is built from mass concrete, and has 21 semicircular spans of 50 feet (15 m). It is the longest concrete railway bridge in Scotland at 416 yards (380 m). Glenfinnan Viaduct has been used as a location in several films and television series, most natably in four of the Harry Potter films.

Inverness CastleInverness IV2 3EG, UK

Inverness Castle sits on a cliff overlooking the River Ness in Inverness, Scotland. The red sandstone structure, displaying an early castellated style, is the work of a few nineteenth-century architects. There has been a castle on this site for many centuries. Until the 30th of March 2020 it housed Inverness Sheriff Court. In April 2017 the north tower of the castle was opened to the public as a view point. At present, only the castle grounds and the north tower are open to the public.

Muck IslandMuck, United Kingdom

Muck is the smallest of four main islands in the Small Isles, part of the Inner Hebrides of Scotland. The larger part of the island is formed from olivine-phyric basalt flows erupted during the Palaeocene.

Neist PointUnnamed Road, Isle of Skye IV55 8WU, UK

Neist Point is a viewpoint on the most westerly point of Isle of Skye. Neist Point Lighthouse has been located there since 1909. Whales, dolphins, porpoises, and basking shark can be seen from the point.

QuiraingQuiraing, Portree IV51 9LA, UK

The Quiraing is a landslip on the eastern face of Meall na Suiramach, the northernmost summit of the Trotternish on the Isle of Skye, Scotland. The whole of the Trotternish Ridge escarpment was formed by a great series of landslips; the Quiraing is the only part of the slip still moving – the road at its base, near Flodigarry, requires repairs each year.