12 Notable Architectures in Bavaria that you should visit - With photos & details

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12 Notable Architectures to explore in Bavaria

Bavaria has a unique culture, largely because of the state's former Catholic majority and conservative traditions. Bavarians have traditionally been proud of their culture, which includes a language, cuisine, architecture, and festivals. The state also has the second-largest economy among the German states by GDP.

AsamkircheSendlinger Str. 32, 80331 München, Germany

Built from 1733 to 1746 by the brothers, sculptor Egid Quirin Asam, and painter Cosmas Damian Asam as their private church. It is considered to be one of the most important buildings of the southern German Late Baroque. The church was built without an order, as a private chapel for the greater glory of God and for the salvation of the builders.

Bamberg CathedralDomplatz, 96049 Bamberg, Germany

Founded in 1002 by Emperor Heinrich II and consecrated in 1012. After the first two cathedrals burned down in the 11th and 12th centuries, the current structure with four large towers, was built in the 13th century. The church contains many works of art, including the marble tomb of the founder and his wife, the Empress Kunigunde.

BMW MuseumAm Olympiapark 2, 80809 München, Germany

The museum contains engines and turbines, aircraft, motorcycles, and vehicles in a plethora of possible variations. In addition to actual models, there are futuristic-looking, even conceptual studies from the past 20 years displayed here.

Church of Our LadyHauptmarkt 14, 90403 Nürnberg, Germany

An example of brick Gothic architecture, it was built on the initiative of Charles IV, Holy Roman Emperor between 1352 and 1362. Numerous works of art from the Middle Ages are kept in the church.

Fortress MarienbergMarienberg, 97012 Würzburg, Germany

A prominent landmark on the left bank of the Main river in Würzburg. The mighty Fortress is a symbol of Würzburg and served as a home of the local prince-bishops for nearly five centuries. The fortress is located on a prominent spur of the 266-metre-high (873 ft) Marienberg which rises about 100 metres over the Main river on the opposite side of the city of Würzburg. Vineyards cover the slopes around the fortress.

FrauenkircheFrauenplatz 12, 80331 München, Germany

Because of local height limits, the church towers of Frauenkirche are widely visible in Munich. City administration prohibits buildings with a height exceeding 99 m in the city, and as a result, no buildings may be built in the city over the aforementioned height. The south tower, which is normally open to those wishing to climb the stairs, will offer a unique view of Munich and the nearby Alps after its current renovation is completed. Both the towers are approximately 99 meters in height.

Imperial Castle of NurembergBurg 17, 90403 Nürnberg, Germany

A group of medieval fortified buildings on a sandstone ridge dominating the historical center of Nuremberg. The castle, together with the city walls, is considered to be one of Europe's most formidable medieval fortifications. It represented the power and importance of the Holy Roman Empire and the role of the Imperial City of Nuremberg.

Neuschwanstein CastleNeuschwansteinstraße 20, 87645 Schwangau, Germany

19th-century Romanesque Revival palace on a rugged hill above the village of Hohenschwangau. The palace was commissioned by Ludwig II, King of Bavaria as a retreat and in honor of the German composer Richard Wagner. The castle was intended as a home for the king until he died in 1886. It was open to the public shortly after his death. The Castle consists of several individual structures that were erected over a length of 150 meters on top of a cliff ridge. The elongate building is furnished with

St. LorenzLorenzer Pl. 1, 90402 Nürnberg, Germany

A medieval church of the former free imperial city of Nuremberg, one of the most prominent churches of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Bavaria. The building and furnishing of the church was cared of by the city council and by wealthy citizens. The west facade, dominated by the two towers is richly articulated, reflecting the wealth of the Nuremberg citizens.

St. Sebaldus ChurchWinklerstraße 26, 90403 Nürnberg, Germany

One of the most important churches of Nuremberg city, and also one of the oldest. It takes its name from Sebaldus, an 8th-century hermit and missionary and patron saint of Nuremberg.

WalhallaWalhallastraße 48, 93093 Donaustauf, Germany

Hall of fame that honours laudable and distinguished people in German history – "politicians, sovereigns, scientists and artists of the German tongue". The hall is a neo-classical building above the Danube River and displays some 65 plaques and 130 busts covering 2,000 years of history, beginning with Arminius, victor at the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest in AD 9.

Würzburg ResidenceResidenzplatz 2, 97070 Würzburg, Germany

Commissioned by the Prince-Bishop of Würzburg- Johann Philipp Franz von Schönborn and his brother Friedrich Carl von Schönborn in 1720, and completed in 1744. Interiors of the residence is considered masterworks of Baroque/Rococo architecture and art include the grand staircase, the chapel, and the Imperial Hall. Since 1981, the Residence has been a UNESCO World Heritage Site.