86 attractions you should visit in Cheshire - With photos & details

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Top 86 attractions to explore in Cheshire

Cheshire, a geographic and historic county and former administrative county of northwestern England. The county covers 905 square miles and has a population of around 1 million. It is mostly rural, with a number of small towns and villages supporting the agricultural and other industries which produce Cheshire cheese, salt, chemicals, and silk.

Adlington Hall and GardensMill Lane, Adlington, Macclesfield SK10 4LF, UK
Iconic Buildings

One of the most beautiful homes in England, Adlington Hall, home of the Leghs from 1315 was built on the site of a Hunting Lodge. Adlington Hall is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade I listed building. The grounds contain eleven Grade II listed buildings, and the grounds themselves have been designated at Grade II* on the National Register of Historic Parks and Gardens. The hall is open to the public for visits and guided tours, and parts of the building c

Alyn RoadAlyn Rd, Mickle Trafford, Chester CH2 4DY, UK
Outdoors- Other
Forests

Alyn Waters is the largest country park in the Wrexham area which was situated in the beautiful Alyn Valley and is currently a Green Flag accredited site. There is a variety of woodland, grassland, and riverside walk throughout the Park helping you to explore the whole site. On the Gwersyllt side, the Visitor and Environmental Education Centre have a large indoor space that is an excellent venue for meetings, education, and community groups.

Anderton Boat Lift Visitor CentreLift Ln, Northwich CW9 6FW, UK
Man-made Structures- Other

The Anderton Boat Lift is a two caisson lift lock near the village of Anderton, Cheshire, in North West England. It provides a 50-foot (15.2 m) vertical link between two navigable waterways: the River Weaver and the Trent and Mersey Canal. The structure is designated as a scheduled monument, and is included in the National Heritage List for England. It is one of only two working boat lifts in the United Kingdom; the other is the Falkirk Wheel in Scotland.

Anson Engine MuseumAnson Rd, Poynton SK12 1TD, UK
Museums

The Anson Engine Museum is situated on the site of the old Anson colliery in Poynton, Cheshire, England. It is the work of Les Cawley and Geoff Challinor who began collecting and showing stationary engines as a hobby. The museum now has one of the largest collections of engines in Europe. The museum site also includes a working blacksmith's smithy and carpentry shop and a café.

Apedale Community Country ParkApedale Energy Station Visitor Centre, Blackbank Road, B5367, High Lane, Newcastle ST5 6AX, UK
Parks

.Apedale Community Country Park is a 454-acre country park in the borough of Newcastle-under-Lyme, Staffordshire. The park offers a varied landscape of woodland, meadows, and pools crossed by many paths and tracks. Overlooking the park is a memorial in the form of a pit wheel dedicated to the mine workers of Staffordshire. This is the newest country park in Staffordshire in what was once a hive of industrial activity.

Arley Hall & GardensArley, Northwich CW9 6NA, UK
Iconic Buildings
Botanical Gardens

Arley Hall is a country house in the village of Arley, Cheshire, England. It is home to the owner, Viscount Ashbrook, and his family. The gardens at Arley Hall are set in scenic Cheshire countryside near Northwich,  they originally date from 1743 when a walled garden was built and large pleasure gardens were laid out.

Astbury Mere Country ParkSandy Ln, Congleton CW12 4FP, UK
Outdoors- Other

Astbury Mere Country Park occupies the site of a former sand quarry, just off Newcastle Road in Congleton, Cheshire. The Country Park and Visitors Centre attracts over 140,000 visitors a year. The 14 acre site includes a 3km all-weather path around the Mere, open space, extensive woodlands and wildflower meadow.

Beeston CastleChapel Ln, Tarporley CW6 9TX, UK
Iconic Buildings

Beeston was originally built as a bastion of power for the Earl Ranulf of Chester. As it’s a little-out-of the way, it was never a site of significant historical importance, but it’s steeped in persistent rumor – persuasive legends tell of the buried treasure of Richard II, who hid bags of gold somewhere on-site.  The striking ruins of this 13th-century castle stand on a 500-foot high cliff of red sandstone, providing excellent views of the surrounding countryside.

Blakemere VillageChester Rd, Northwich CW8 2EB, UK
Outdoors- Other

Blakemere Village is home to a unique collective of independent shops and activities, including segway and award-winning Birds of Prey experiences, a craft workshop, children’s trails, plus food and drink outlets, all set in the heart of Cheshire. Take a stroll through the nearby woodlands, enjoy the free outdoor adventure playpark or choose many daily activities including segway or the awe-inspiring Birds of Prey experiences.

Blue Planet AquariumCheshire Oaks, Longlooms Rd, Ellesmere Port CH65 9LF, UK
Aquariums

The Blue Planet Aquarium is a marine and freshwater aquarium located by the Cheshire Oaks retail and leisure complex in Ellesmere Port, Cheshire, England. When opened by the Queen in July 1998.  The interior houses tanks, pools, and submerged tunnels designed to take the visitor through different habitats of the marine environment. The aquarium contains many varieties of marine and freshwater fish, including more types of shark than anywhere else in Britain.

Bridgewater CanalBridgewater Canal, United Kingdom
Lake/ River/ Ponds

The Bridgewater Canal is a 65km canal stretching from Runcorn to Leigh and is owned and operated by the Peel Group. It is sometimes described as England’s first canal and has a special place in history as the first canal in Britain to be built without following an existing watercourse, and so became a model for those that followed it.

Capesthorne HallCongleton Rd, Siddington, Macclesfield SK11 9JY, UK
Iconic Buildings

Capesthorne Hall is a beautiful family-owned stately home that can be the exclusive venue for your dream wedding day. Set in 100 acres of the beautiful picturesque Cheshire countryside, this truly unique wedding venue overlooks three lakes and stunning formal gardens. Today the hall, chapel and grounds are privately owned by the Bromley-Davenport family. They are open to the public at advertised times and are used for special events.

Cat and Fiddle LaneCat and Fiddle Ln, Ilkeston DE7, UK
Man-made Structures- Other

The 7.5mile stretch of road between Macclesfield and Buxton, in the county of Cheshire, has been named the most dangerous road in Britain. Known locally as Cat and Fiddle, it should more fittingly be dubbed 'the widow-maker' because of its mounting death toll. It is famous for its scenic views across the Greater Manchester conurbation, the Peak District National Park and the Cheshire Plain, and for its many bends. It is extremely popular with motorcyclists and is often classed as the most danger

CatalystMersey Rd, Widnes WA8 0DF, UK
Museums

The Catalyst Science Discovery Centre is a science and technology museum in Widnes, Halton, North-West England. It holds a collection of archives relating to the chemical industry, these include documents, photographs, and the entire research archive of the ICI General Chemical Division. One of the iconic museums in this area and it gives you an offer to interact with present-day science.

Cheshire Military MuseumColvin House, Grosvenor St, Chester CH1 2DN, UK
Museums

Cheshire Military Museum is situated in the former barrack block of Chester Castle. Designed by Thomas Harrison and completed in 1810. It houses objects relating to the soldiers of Cheshire, in particular, those Regiments which have a long association with the city of Chester; the Cheshire Regiment, Cheshire Yeomanry, 5th Royal Inniskilling Dragoon Guards, and the 3rd Carabiniers.  The building is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade I listed building.

Chester Castle: Agricola Tower and Castle WallsGrosvenor St, Chester CH1 2DN, UK
Iconic Buildings

The 12th-century Agricola Tower was the first stone gateway to Chester Castle, which had been founded by William the Conqueror in 1070 in the south-west part of the city. Chester was important strategically since it was the site of resistance to William the Conqueror, who overcame it in 1070. Parts of the neoclassical buildings are used today as Crown Courts and as a military museum. The museum and the medieval remains are a tourist attraction.

Chester CathedralSt Werburgh St, Chester CH1 2DY, UK
Churches

Chester Cathedral is a Church of England cathedral and the mother church of the Diocese of Chester. The cathedral is a Grade I listed building, and part of a heritage site that also includes the former monastic buildings to the north, which are also listed Grade I. All the major styles of English medieval architecture, from Norman to Perpendicular, are represented in the present building.

Chester City WallsCity Walls, Chester CH1 2JH, UK
Man-made Structures- Other
Old Ruins

The city walls are the oldest, longest, and most complete in Britain, parts of which are almost 2000 years old. They were extended and developed in the Saxon period. During the 12th century, the Normans rebuilt and extended the Walls so for the first time since the Romans, the Walls formed a completed circuit around Chester. Throughout the middle ages, Chester was one of the most protected and strategically important cities in the county.

Chester RacecourseThe Racecourse, Chester CH1 2LY, UK
Man-made Structures- Other

Chester Racecourse, known as the Roodee, is officially recognized by the Guinness World Records as the oldest racecourse still in operation. Horse racing at Chester dates back to the early sixteenth century, with 1539 cited as the year racing began. It is also thought to be the smallest racecourse of significance in England at 1 mile and 1 furlong long.

Chester Roman AmphitheatreRoman Amphitheatre, Little St John St, Chester CH1 1RE, UK
Man-made Structures- Other
Old Ruins

One of the largest amphitheatre in Britain which was used for entertainment and military training.  It lay just outside the south-east corner of the Roman legionary fortress and was probably used both for entertainments and for practising troop manoeuvres and weapon training. The two buildings differed from each other and from all other British amphitheatres, underlining the importance of Roman Chester. This site is now in the care of English Heritage.

Map of attractions in Cheshire