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16 Man-made Structures- Other to explore in Cheshire

Cheshire

Cheshire, a geographic and historic county and former administrative county of northwestern England. The county covers 905 square miles and has a population of around 1 million. It is mostly rural, with a number of small towns and villages supporting the agricultural and other industries which produce Cheshire cheese, salt, chemicals, and silk.

Anderton Boat Lift Visitor Centre
Anderton Boat Lift Visitor CentreLift Ln, Northwich CW9 6FW, UK

The Anderton Boat Lift is a two caisson lift lock near the village of Anderton, Cheshire, in North West England. It provides a 50-foot (15.2 m) vertical link between two navigable waterways: the River Weaver and the Trent and Mersey Canal. The structure is designated as a scheduled monument, and is included in the National Heritage List for England. It is one of only two working boat lifts in the United Kingdom; the other is the Falkirk Wheel in Scotland.

Cat and Fiddle Lane
Cat and Fiddle LaneCat and Fiddle Ln, Ilkeston DE7, UK

The 7.5mile stretch of road between Macclesfield and Buxton, in the county of Cheshire, has been named the most dangerous road in Britain. Known locally as Cat and Fiddle, it should more fittingly be dubbed 'the widow-maker' because of its mounting death toll. It is famous for its scenic views across the Greater Manchester conurbation, the Peak District National Park and the Cheshire Plain, and for its many bends. It is extremely popular with motorcyclists and is often classed as the most danger

Chester City Walls
Chester City WallsCity Walls, Chester CH1 2JH, UK

The city walls are the oldest, longest, and most complete in Britain, parts of which are almost 2000 years old. They were extended and developed in the Saxon period. During the 12th century, the Normans rebuilt and extended the Walls so for the first time since the Romans, the Walls formed a completed circuit around Chester. Throughout the middle ages, Chester was one of the most protected and strategically important cities in the county.

Chester Racecourse
Chester RacecourseThe Racecourse, Chester CH1 2LY, UK

Chester Racecourse, known as the Roodee, is officially recognized by the Guinness World Records as the oldest racecourse still in operation. Horse racing at Chester dates back to the early sixteenth century, with 1539 cited as the year racing began. It is also thought to be the smallest racecourse of significance in England at 1 mile and 1 furlong long.

Chester Roman Amphitheatre
Chester Roman AmphitheatreRoman Amphitheatre, Little St John St, Chester CH1 1RE, UK

One of the largest amphitheatre in Britain which was used for entertainment and military training. It lay just outside the south-east corner of the Roman legionary fortress and was probably used both for entertainments and for practising troop manoeuvres and weapon training. The two buildings differed from each other and from all other British amphitheatres, underlining the importance of Roman Chester. This site is now in the care of English Heritage.

Cotebrook Shire Horse Centre
Cotebrook Shire Horse CentreEaton Ln, Cotebrook, Tarporley CW6 9DP, UK

Cotebrook Shire Horse Centre is the only Shire Horse stud farm in the UK open to the public, with up to 30 shires to see during the stud season. As well as the fabulous Shire horses there is a selection of British animals and birdlife both wild and domesticated including rare breeds.

Dewa Roman Experience
Dewa Roman Experience1-2, off Pierpoint Ln, Bridge St, Chester CH1 1NL, UK

The Dewa Roman Experience celebrates the city of Chester’s heritage as the Roman town of Dewa. Dewa was one of the largest Roman towns in Britain and home to the 20th legion. You can see exhibits of a Roman galley and walk through reconstructed streets of Roman Chester taking in a Roman barracks, a bath-house, granary, taverna and market stalls.

Eastgate Clock
Eastgate Clock41-45 Eastgate St, Chester CH1 1LE, UK

The Eastgate Clock is a turret clock built above the Eastgate of the ancient walls of Chester. It is the most iconic landmark and the second most photographed clock in the world after Big Ben. The clock was built in 1899 to celebrate Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee of 1897. The whole structure, gateway, and clock, was designated as a Grade I listed building on 28 July 1955.

Jodrell Bank Discovery Centre
Jodrell Bank Discovery CentreMacclesfield SK11 9DL, UK

Jodrell Bank Observatory lies 20 miles south of Manchester on the A535 between Junctions 17 and 18 of the M6 motorway. Jodrell Bank Observatory lies 20 miles south of Manchester on the A535 between Junctions 17 and 18 of the M6 motorway. The Discovery Centre is home to the iconic Lovell Telescope, built-in 1957 by Sir Bernard Lovell, the world's first fully steerable radio telescope which pioneered developments in radio astronomy.

Macclesfield Canal
Macclesfield CanalMacclesfield Canal, United Kingdom

The Macclesfield Canal passes through mostly green and rural surroundings, with Victorian mills and warehouses along the way adding a distinctive character. It passes through beautiful countryside and touches on several towns – Bollington, Macclesfield, and Congleton. The route of the canal was surveyed by Thomas Telford and construction was engineered by William Crosley. The completed canal was opened on 9th November 1831 at a cost of £320,000.

Quarry Bank
Quarry BankStyal Rd, Styal, Wilmslow SK9 4LA, UK

Quarry Bank is one of Britain's greatest industrial heritage sites, showing how a complete industrial community lived. Here you can discover the story of mill workers, mill owners and how the Industrial Revolution changed our world forever. it was the headquarters of one of the largest cotton manufacturing businesses in the world. The mill sits on the banks of the River Bollin in the Styal Estate in close proximity to Manchester – the hub of Britain’s cotton industry.

Shropshire Union Canal
Shropshire Union CanalShropshire Union Canal, Middlewich CW10 0NA, UK

The Shropshire Union Canal is a charmingly rural and isolated waterway for much of its length. With stretches where there are no towns for miles. It runs from the edge of urban Wolverhampton through some of the most underpopulated areas of England to the River Mersey at Ellesmere Port, about sixty miles in all and taking a fairly leisurely four days to cruise.

The Ice Cream Farm
The Ice Cream FarmDrumlan Hall, Newton Ln, Cheshire, Chester CH3 9NE, UK

It is the world's largest family-friendly ice cream parlour adventure park. Perfect for families, kids & toddlers Set in the picturesque location between Beeston and Peckforton Castle

Trent and Mersey Canal
Trent and Mersey CanalTrent and Mersey Canal, United Kingdom

The Trent & Mersey Canal was the country’s first long-distance canal. It is full of interesting features, which reflect its history. These include the Harecastle Tunnel, the lengthy lock flight known as ‘Heartbreak Hill’, and the traditional canal town of Shardlow. It is a "narrow canal" for the vast majority of its length, but at the extremities to the east of Burton upon Trent and north of Middlewich, it is a wide canal.

Trentabank Reservoir
Trentabank ReservoirTrentabank Reservoir, Macclesfield SK11 0NS, UK

Trentabank Reservoir is located within Macclesfield Forest, partly in the Peak District National Park in England, and is home to rich unimproved uplands and grasslands. The reservoir is surrounded mainly by coniferous plantations and is also home to about 22 pairs of herons.

Wales Coast Path
Wales Coast PathWales Coast Path, Chester, UK

The Wales Coast Path is the first path in the world to follow a country’s coastline in its entirety. Dip in anywhere along its 870 miles and delight in jaw-dropping views, contemporary cultural hotspots, unforgettable encounters with nature, and thousands of years of history. It runs through eleven national nature reserves and other nature reserves such as those managed by the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds and The Wildlife Trusts.

Map of Man-made Structures- Other to explore in Cheshire