3 Palaces in Laos that you should visit - With photos & details

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3 Palaces to explore in Laos

A socialist state and the only landlocked country in Southeast Asia lying at the heart of the Indochinese peninsula. Laos traces its historic and cultural identity to Lan Xang, which existed from the 14th century to the 18th century as one of the largest kingdoms in Southeast Asia.

Champasak PalaceChampasak Palace, Pakxé, Laos

Champasak Palace, in Pakse, Laos, was intended to be a residence of the Prince of Champasak, Chao Boun Oum. However, he had to abandon it in 1974 before it was finished, as the Royal Lao government was overthrown by the communist Pathet Lao. After the revolution, the building was completed and served as a venue for the communist party congresses and accommodation for visiting dignitaries. The palace was converted into a hotel in 1995.

The Presidential Palace is the official residence of the President of Laos, who, by convention, also holds the position of General Secretary of the Lao People's Revolutionary Party. The building is surrounded by well-manicured lawns and gardens and fenced off by tall walls and a wrought iron gate. The Presidential Palace is not to be confused with the official home of the Lao president which is located in the Vientiane suburb of Ban Phonthan. The palace is lit up in the evening and offers a grea

Royal Palace27 Ounheun Rd, Luang Prabang, Laos

The former Royal Palace, now turned into a museum is situated on the banks of the Mekong river, facing the sacred Mount Phousi. Locally the Palace is known as the Haw Kham or Ho Kham, which translates to “Golden Palace”. The museum houses the Phra Bang, the country’s most sacred Buddha image, which is kept in a richly ornamented shrine. The Palace was built between 1904 and 1909 during the time of French colonial occupation as the residence of the Laos Royal Family.