4 Lake/ River/ Ponds in United Kingdom that you should visit - With photos & details

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4 Lake/ River/ Ponds to explore in United Kingdom

The United Kingdom consists of four constituent countries: England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland. It is the sixth-largest economy by nominal GDP and ninth-largest economy by purchasing power parity. It has a high-income economy and has a very high Human Development Index rating, ranking 14th in the world. It was the world's first industrialised country and the world's foremost power during the 19th and early 20th centuries.

Hyde ParkLondon, UK

Largest Royal Park in London, divided by the Serpentine and the Long Water lakes. The park covers 142 hectares (350 acres) and it is a popular spot for demonstrations, parades and other events.

Loch NessLoch Ness, United Kingdom

A large, deep, freshwater lake in the Scottish Highlands extending for approximately 37 kilometres (23 miles) southwest of Inverness. Its deepest point is 230 metres (126 fathoms; 755 feet). Loch Ness is best known for alleged sightings of the cryptozoological Loch Ness Monster, also known affectionately as "Nessie". It is one of a series of interconnected, murky bodies of water in Scotland; its water visibility is exceptionally low due to a high peat content in the surrounding soil.

Neptune's StaircaseBanavie, Fort William PH33 7NG, UK

Neptune's Staircase is a staircase lock comprising eight locks on the Caledonian Canal which connects the Scottish east coast at Inverness with the west coast at Corpach near Fort William. Built by Thomas Telford between 1803 and 1822, it is the longest staircase lock in Britain, lifting boats 64 feet (20 m). It consists of eight locks, each 180 feet (55 m) by 40 feet (12 m), and it takes boats about 90 minutes to pass through the system.

St James's ParkLondon SW1A 2BJ, UK

This 23-hectare (57-acre) park has a small lake, St James's Park Lake, with two islands, West Island and Duck Island, the latter named for the lake's collection of waterfowl. A resident colony of pelicans has been a feature of the park since a Russian ambassador donated them to Charles II in 1664.