10 Old Ruins in Norway that you should visit - With photos & details

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10 Old Ruins to explore in Norway

The country has the fourth-highest per capita income in the world. It has the world's largest sovereign wealth fund, with a value of US$1 trillion. Norway has had the highest Human Development Index ranking in the world since 2009, a position also held previously between 2001 and 2006.

AustråttborgenØrland, Norway

Austrått is one of the oldest manors in Norway, dating from as early as the Viking Period. The fief holder (later the Earl), Finn Arnesson, lived there for several years during the 11th century. Finn was the father-in-law of Malcolm Canmore, King of Scots.  TI is now one of the tourist attraction in this area.

Bergenhus Fortress5003 Bergen, Norway

Bergenhus fortress is a fortress located in Bergen, Norway. The fortress contains buildings dating as far back as the 1240s, as well as later constructions built as recently as World War II.

Gamle StavangerØvre Strandgate, 4005 Stavanger, Norway

Gamle Stavanger is a historic area of the city of Stavanger in Rogaland, Norway. The area consists largely of restored wooden buildings which were built in the 18th century and at the beginning of the 19th century. The area selected for conservation was the one considered the least desirable, consisting of small rundown wooden buildings located on the western side of Vågen, the inner harbor area of Stavanger. This area has a selection of preserved wood houses dating from both the 19th and 20th c

Hamar CathedralKirkebakken 14, 2317 Hamar, Norway

The ruins of the old Hamar Cathedral are situated on the Domkirkeodden promontory. This is a place which paves light to the medieval Hamar by listening to the beautiful song at the cathedral ruins or by tasting the monks' herbal drink made from medieval herbs from our own garden. We can also tailor your event to meet your wishes.

Istrehågan, Iron age Cemetary3280 Tjodalyng, Norway

Istrehågan is a burial ground from the early age of migration, with 5 stone settings from around 400-600 AD. Remains from persons, beer's paws, china, a needle, and other grave gifts are found at Jåberg in Tjølling.  The cultural monument Istrehågan consists of five stone settings and two ship settings. The biggest one is 25 meters long and consists of 18 single erect stones.

MaridalenMaridalen, Oslo kommune, Norway

Ruins after the Margareta Church in the Maridalen valley, one of few remains in Oslo from the Middle Ages. It was built around the year 1250, was a small, single-nave church with choir, dedicated to St. Margareta. The medieval church was partly excavated and restored in 1934, and is beautifully situated at Kirkeby in the north end of the lake Maridalsvannet.

Munkeby klosterMunkeberget, 7600 Levanger, Norway

The monastery ruins are in a remote and peaceful location, which is typical of Cistercian monasteries. The only part of the monastery that is still visible today is the church, which was built from stone. The monastery was probably established by English monks during the last half of the 12th century. Munkeby was one of four Cistercian monasteries in Norway in the Middle Ages.

SlottsfjelltårnetSlottsfjelltårnet, 3111 Tønsberg, Norway

Slottsfjellet is Tønsberg's most striking landmark. The tower was completed in 1888 in connection with the city's 1000th anniversary. The tower is 17 meters high and has a fantastic view from the top. Inside the tower is the cross from St. Mary's Church, bricks found by the ruins, and an exhibition. Cato Enger's bronze model of old Tønsberg Castrum Tunsbergis stands outside the tower.

The Borre MoundsBirkelyveien 9, 3182 Borre, Norway

Borre mound cemetery forms part of the Borre National Park at Horten in Vestfold og Telemark, Norway.[2][3] It is the largest burial mound site in Northern Europe.It is home to seven large and 21 smaller burial mounds.

The Telemark Canal3724 Skien, Norway

The Telemark Canal was hewn out of the rocks by hand well over 100 years ago, and when completed in 1892. Europeans described it as the "eighth wonder of the world". 500 men had worked for five years to dynamite their way through the rocks. The Canal consists of eight locks with a total of 18 lock chambers, and a difference in height of 72 metres.