8 Old Ruins in Assam that you should visit - With photos & details

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8 Old Ruins to explore in Assam

Assam is a state in northeastern India, situated south of the eastern Himalayas along the Brahmaputra and Barak River valleys. Assam covers an area of 78,438 km2. The state is bordered by Bhutan and Arunachal Pradesh to the north; Nagaland and Manipur to the east; Meghalaya, Tripura, Mizoram and Bangladesh to the south; and West Bengal to the west via the Siliguri Corridor, a 22 kilometres strip of land that connects the state to the rest of India

Cachari Ruins KhaspurThaligram Road, Nayagram, Assam 788031, India

The Kachari kingdom was a powerful kingdom ruled by the Dimasa King. The Dimasa kachari kingdom and others that developed in the wake of the Kamarupa kingdom were led by chieftains of indigenous communities of Assam and are examples of indigenous state formations in Medieval Assam. Remnants of the Dimasa kingdom lingered until the advent of the British, and this kingdom gave its name to two districts in Assam: Cachar and North Cachar Hills.

Gargaon palaceGarhgaon, Assam 785685, India

Gargaon Palace, the royal seat of Ahom dynasty, is a popular attraction of Sibsagar, located about 13 km away. Gargaon Palace was built in the year 1540 by King Suklemnung, who was the 15th King from the Ahom Dynasty. The palace was rebuilt in the year 1762 by King Rajesshar Singha. Of the seven floors of the palace, three were underground which had many underground passages. All these were later closed by the East India Company.

Malini ThanLikabali H.Q Including Lipu, Assam 787059, India

This religious destination is located about 42 km away from the district towards the north eastern direction. This place of worship had been built in dedication to Goddess Malini who had been worshiped here since the ancient times. Being a famous pilgrimage site amidst the hilly ranges of Arunachal Pradesh it is flocked by many devotees and pilgrims almost all round the year. Many archaeological excavations have been carried out in this spot .

Namdang Stone BridgeNamdang Stone Bridge, Gaurisagar, Assam 785664, India

The Namdang Stone Bridge is a historic bridge located a few kilometers away from Sibsagar town in Assam, India. It was constructed in 1703 by craftmen brought from Bengal during the reign of Ahom king Rudra Singha. The bridge is 60 m  long, 6.5 m  wide and 1.7 m  high. It runs over the Namdang river, a tributary of the Dikhou river. The present National Highway 37 is passing over it. The unique characteristic of the bridge is that it was cut out from a single solid piece of rock .

Rang GharAT Rd, Joysagar, Dicial Dhulia Gaon, Assam 785697, India

Rang ghar is a two-storeyed building which once served as the royal sports-pavilion where Ahom kings and nobles were spectators at games like buffalo fights and other sports at Rupahi Pathar (pathar meaning "field" in Assamese) - particularly during the Rongali Bihu festival in the Ahom capital of Rangpur.

Sri Surya PaharBhatiapara, Assam 783101, India

Sri surya pahar is a significant but relatively unknown archaeological site in Assam. The site is a hilly terrain where several rock-cut Shivalingas, votive stupas and the deities of Hindu, Buddhist and Jain pantheon are scattered in an area of about one km. The site is centered on the hills . The popular belief is that 99999 Shiva Lingas were engraved here by Vyasa in order to build up a second Kashi and once it was one of the holiest pilgrimage sites in the region.

Talatal GharDuboroni Ali Rd, Joysagar, Dicial Dhulia Gaon, Assam 785697, India

The Talatal Ghar or the Rangpur Palace is situated in the northern region of Assam and is one of the most impressive of Tai Ahom architecture. Not only does it stand as a worthy testament to the vibrant Assamese culture and its rich history, but it is also the largest of all Ahom monuments in the entire world. History buffs and architecture lovers should add Talatal Ghar to their go-to list.

Thengal BhawanLohang Bebejia, Assam 785014, India

Thengal Bhawan was built in 1880 by Raibahadur Siva Prasad Barooah. In 1929, he published a weekly Assamese newspaper. Later, he established his printing press and office at Thengal Bhawan and managed to publish a daily newspaper, Dainik Batori. Siva Prasad Barooah was the owner and Bagmibar Nilamani Phukan was the editor of this daily newspaper. This newspaper was published from such a place, Thengal Bhawan, where there was no post office.