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Eas a’ Chrannaig - Things to Know Before Visiting

Glenashdale Burn, Isle of Arran KA27 8QS, UK

Waterfalls

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About Eas a’ Chrannaig

Eas a’ Chrannaig also known as the Glenashdale Falls is a waterfall on the island of Arran, Scotland. It has a series of falls on the Glenashdale Burn, which flows from moorland near the summit of Tighvein eastwards towards Whiting Bay, from which there is a tourist trail leading some 4 kilometres up Glenashdale.


Attractions Near Eas a’ Chrannaig

Giants' Graves
Giants' Graves1.35km from Eas a’ Chrannaig

The Giants' Graves are the remains of two Neolithic chambered tombs surrounded by tall trees near Whiting Bay on Arran. The monument comprises two chambered Clyde type long cairns of the neolithic period, some 4500 to 5500 years old. The monument is of national importance because it represents the remains of two well preserved and substantial monuments which have the potential to provide information about Neolithic burial and ritual practices.

Eas Mor (waterfall)
Eas Mor (waterfall)3.38km from Eas a’ Chrannaig

Eas Mor is a dramatic waterfall set in beautiful woodlands near the southern tip of Arran, just north of Kildonan. A trail leads through the woodlands to several viewing platforms, and you can extend the walk to take in Loch Garbad. The last stop on the walk offers a dramatic view of the single, long plume of the waterfall that dives down the cliff face.

Kildonan Castle
Kildonan Castle4.13km from Eas a’ Chrannaig

Kildonan Castle stands in the small village of Kildonan on the southern coast of the Isle of Arran in Scotland. The castle's name is derived from the name of a former resident, Saint Donan, who is said to be buried on the island. It was built in the 13th century by the MacDonalds, the Lords of the Isles. The castle stands on the cliffs, overlooking the island of Pladda and the entrance to the Firth of Clyde. It was built to defend against enemies attacking through the Firth.

Pladda
Pladda5.82km from Eas a’ Chrannaig

Pladda is home to an attractive lighthouse that was first lit in October 1790 and joined the lights on the Mull of Kintyre, Cumbrae in the Firth of Clyde, and Copeland light on the Irish coast. To allow Mariners to distinguish it from the other lights, Pladda had to show a lower light from a small lantern 20 feet below the original one – an arrangement that was soon made permanent and was to operate for more than 100 years.

Holy Isle
Holy Isle5.88km from Eas a’ Chrannaig

Holy Isle is an island in Lamlash Bay, just off the Isle of Arran. It was a sacred site dedicated to peace and well being, there is a Centre for World Peace and Health at the north of the island where an ongoing course and retreat programme takes place. Overnight guests are welcome to stay at the centre, which has guest house facilities. There is a closed Buddhist retreat at the south of the island.

The Holy Isle
The Holy Isle6.35km from Eas a’ Chrannaig

The island has a long history as a sacred site, with a spring or holy well held to have healing properties, the hermit cave of 6th century monk St Molaise, and evidence of a 13th-century monastery. An old Gaelic name for the island was Eilean MoLaise, Molaise's Island; this is the origin of "Lamlash", the name of the village on Arran that faces Holy Island. There is a regular ferry service from Lamlash, and the island is popular with holiday makers staying on Arran.

Where is Eas a’ Chrannaig

Discover More Attractions in North Ayrshire Council, Where Eas a’ Chrannaig Is Located

North Ayrshire Council

North Ayrshire is one of 32 council areas in Scotland. It has a population of roughly 135,280 people. It is located in the southwest of Scotland, and borders the areas of Inverclyde to the north, Renfrewshire to the northeast and East Ayrshire and South Ayrshire to the east and south respectively. North Ayrshire Council is a hung Council. North Ayrshire also forms part of the east coast of the Firth of Clyde.

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