20 Attractions to Explore Near Banton Loch

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Colzium Estate and Museum

Colzium Estate and Museum

0.95km from Banton Loch

Colzium House was once the seat of the Edmonstone family but became the property of the Burgh of Kilsyth after the Second World War. Built in 1783, it was substantially enlarged in 1861. Much of the original building was pulled down in the late 1940s, due to dry rot, but the Victorian frontage and wings survive to form the house we see today.

Burngreen Park

Burngreen Park

2.24km from Banton Loch

Burngreen park situated between the Ebroch and Garrel burns covers an area of one hectare. It is a formal park with attractive floral displays and green spaces. Other features include the war memorial for the people of Kilsyth and the recently restored bandstand and drinking fountain.

Allanfauld Farm

Allanfauld Farm

2.41km from Banton Loch

Allanfauld is a family farm run by Archie and Libby MacGregor, situated close to the town of Kilsyth, deep in the heart of the Scottish countryside. They offer comfortable and relaxing accommodation on a working beef and sheep farm, ensuring an unforgettable holiday experience.

Auchinstarry Quarry

Auchinstarry Quarry

2.61km from Banton Loch

Auchinstarry Quarry is a central belt Dolerite quarry near Croy, that has been landscaped to provide a pleasant enough venue. Has the benefit of being close to a main line train-station, making it easy to reach for those in Glasgow or Edinburgh without a car. For those with a car, parking is very close - one of those belay from the car venues. It is a very popular rock-climbing destination, boasting a very wide range of climbing.

Auchinstarry Marina Auchinstarry

Auchinstarry Marina Auchinstarry

2.64km from Banton Loch

Auchinstarry is a 50 berth marina with long and short term moorings and if you fancy setting sail along the canals why not sign up for inland waterways training with Seaskills The Forth & Clyde Canal Society also operate barges for hire along the canal. If its adventure you’re looking for you will find at Outdoor Trax, where you can hire mountain bikes, canoes and kayaks or why not why try rock climbing and abseiling within the nearby quarry.

Cumbernauld House Park

Cumbernauld House Park

4.24km from Banton Loch

Cumbernauld House is an 18th-century Vivido Scottish country house located in Cumbernauld, Scotland. It has a well developed history, with ties to the Romans, Normans, James IV, Mary Stewart, Cromwell, Covenanters, and the Jacobites. More recently it has provided the people of Cumbernauld with attractive open space for relaxing and walking.

Antonine Wall

Antonine Wall

4.25km from Banton Loch

The Antonine Wall, known to the Romans as Vallum Antonini, was a turf fortification on stone foundations, built by the Romans across what is now the Central Belt of Scotland, between the Firth of Forth and the Firth of Clyde. Built some twenty years after Hadrian's Wall to the south, and intended to supersede it, while it was garrisoned it was the northernmost frontier barrier of the Roman Empire. It spanned approximately 63 kilometres and was about 3 metres high and 5 metres wide.

Bar Hill Roman Fort (Antonine Wall)

Bar Hill Fort was a Roman fort on the Antonine Wall in Scotland. It was built around the year 142 A.D. Bar Hill Fort was one of 16 known forts along the Antonine Wall, which was built across Scotland's central belt from AD 140.

Kilsyth Hills

Kilsyth Hills

4.32km from Banton Loch

Kilsyth is a town and civil parish in North Lanarkshire, roughly halfway between Glasgow and Stirling in Scotland. The estimated population is 9,860. The town is famous for the Battle of Kilsyth and the religious revivals of the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries. The town now has links with Cumbernauld at one time being part of Cumbernauld and Kilsyth District Council. The towns also have the same members of parliament at Holyrood and Westminster.

Broadwood Loch

Broadwood Loch

5.28km from Banton Loch

Broadwood Loch is a man-made loch with surrounding woodland, grassland and lowland peat bog habitats. The wildlife ponds are home to damselflies and dragonflies and swallows can be seen swooping overhead in summer. There is a circular walk round the loch.

Duncarron Medieval Village

Duncarron Medieval Village

5.34km from Banton Loch

Duncarron Medieval Village is a medieval fortified village currently under construction and run by the Clanranald Trust. Francis Lopez, Screen Commission Assistant, recently went on a recce of the site to find out more. The medieval village is being built with the help of volunteers from all walks of life, and is intended to preserve and disseminate Scottish culture and heritage through education, active participation and entertainment.

Luggie Water

Luggie Water

6.81km from Banton Loch

The Luggie Water is one of two streams which flow out of Cumbernauld. The Scottish New Town’s name derives from the Gaelic for "the meeting of the waters" and it’s possible this refers to the Luggie Water and the Red Burn, both of which run through Cumbernauld but which never meet.

Palacerigg Country Park

Palacerigg Country Park

7.06km from Banton Loch

Palacerigg Country Park spans 300 hectares of grassland, woodlands, moorlands and ponds. The park hosts a variety of wildlife, wild deer, kestrels and two separate breeds of owl have been spotted in the park. The visitor centre is home to a museum and café and has a mural by the artist Alasdair Gray. There are 2 traditionally built longhouses which are used to demonstrate a variety of woodland crafts. It was one of the iconic attraction in this area and attracts a lot of tourists.

Carron Valley Reservoir

Carron Valley Reservoir

7.15km from Banton Loch

Carron Valley reservoir is one of the most scenic trout fisheries in Scotland. Carron Valley is a popular place for outdoor activities such as mountain biking, hiking and the reservoir offers one of the most scenic trout fisheries in Scotland.

Forth and Clyde Canal

Forth and Clyde Canal

7.31km from Banton Loch

The Forth and Clyde Canal is a canal opened in 1790, crossing central Scotland to link the Firth of Clyde and the Firth of Forth and provided a safe route for coasters during the war with France. Pleasure steamers used the canal from 1893 until the outbreak of World War II. The canal is 35 miles long and it runs from the River Carron at Grangemouth to the River Clyde at Bowling, and had an important basin at Port Dundas in Glasgow.

Antermony Loch

Antermony Loch

7.42km from Banton Loch

Anternomy Loch is a freshwater lake in the Scottish Lowlands. It is located at the foot of the Campsie Fells about one kilometer east of the village of Milton of Campsie and about twelve kilometers northeast of Glasgow in the Council Area East Dunbartonshire . The lake is accessible by car from Glasgow via the A803 . Anternomy Loch is best known as a fishing area where brown trout and rainbow trout can be caught. In addition, Anternomy Loch has a rich bird life. Coots , swans , ducks and cormor

Seabegs Wood

Seabegs Wood

7.59km from Banton Loch

Seabegs Wood was the site of a Roman fortlet on the Antonine Wall in Scotland. At Seabegs, the outline of Antonine's Wall, has lasted. Archaeologists from previous generations recorded this and stated that the ditch was deep and waterlogged. There is an underpass under thForth and Clyde Canal nearby known locally as the Pend.

Fannyside Lochs

Fannyside Lochs

7.89km from Banton Loch

Fannyside Lochs is a water feature in Scotland. Fannyside Lochs is situated northeast of Greengairs, close to Fannyside Lodge. The loch, 2¾ mile SE of Cumbernauld town, lies 550 feet above sea-level, and measures 6¾ furlongs in length by from 1 to 2 furlongs in breadth. It contains a few pike and perch, but no trout. The moor lies around the loch, chiefly on the N side, comprises upwards of 3 square miles, and has traces of a Roman road, running southward from Castlecary.—Ord. Sur., sh. 31, 1867

Meikle Bin

Meikle Bin

8.29km from Banton Loch

Meikle Bin is a peak in the Campsie Fells in Central Scotland. It is the second highest of the group at 570m and with that height it is classified as a Marilyn. The hill is a prominent local landmark for the people of the towns surrounding the Campsie Fells. It was the site of a fatal accident in January 1950, when a Fairey Firefly of the Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm crashed just below the summit in low cloud while en route to HMS Sanderling Naval Air Station. Both crewmen were killed on impact. Wre

Cort-ma Law

Cort-ma Law

8.99km from Banton Loch

Cort-ma Law is a summit in the Campsie Fells region or range in Scotland. Cort-ma Law East Top is 526 metres high. All the walking routes up Cort-ma Law East Top on Mud and Routes can be found below. The top can be identified by the No Obvious Features.. Other Notes: . Cort-ma Law East Top is a child summit of Meikle Bin. It was a good trekking destination and also you can spend some beautiful time by its nice views.

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Know more about Banton Loch

Banton Loch

Banton Loch

Banton Loch, Glasgow G65, UK

Banton Loch lies a half-mile west southwest of Banton on the eastern edge of Kilsyth. The loch contains the small Speirs Island which was once rather larger and has associations with the Battle of Kilsyth, which was fought nearby in 1645. The loch expanded to supply the Forth & Clyde Canal, which passes a half-mile to the south, and later became the property of the London Midland & Scottish Railway. Colzium House lies a quarter-mile to the west.