5 Monuments in United Kingdom that you should visit - With photos & details

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5 Monuments to explore in United Kingdom

The United Kingdom consists of four constituent countries: England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland. It is the sixth-largest economy by nominal GDP and ninth-largest economy by purchasing power parity. It has a high-income economy and has a very high Human Development Index rating, ranking 14th in the world. It was the world's first industrialised country and the world's foremost power during the 19th and early 20th centuries.

Big BenWestminster, London SW1A 0AA, UK

When completed in 1859, its clock was the largest and most accurate four-faced striking and chiming clock in the world. The tower stands 315 feet (96 m) tall, and the climb from ground level to the belfry is 334 steps. Its base is square, measuring 39 feet (12 m) on each side. Dials of the clock are 23 feet (7.0 m) in diameter.

Chanonry PointFortrose IV10 8SD, UK

Chanonry Point lies at the end of Chanonry Ness, a spit of land extending into the Moray Firth. It is one of the best spots in the UK to view bottlenose dolphins from the land. The dolphins are often visible off Chanonry point, particularly on an incoming tide when they play and fish in the strong currents. An active lighthouse is also situated at the tip of the point.

Clava CairnsInverness IV2 5EU, UK

The Clava cairn is a type of Bronze Age circular chamber tomb cairn. There are about 50 cairns of this type in an area round about Inverness. There are two sub-types, one typically consisting of a corbelled passage grave with a single burial chamber linked to the entrance by a short passage and covered with a cairn of stones. In the other sub-type an annular ring cairn encloses an apparently unroofed area with no formal means of access from the outside.

Culloden BattlefieldCulloden Moor, Inverness IV2 5EU, UK

The Battle of Culloden was the final confrontation of the Jacobite rising of 1745. On 16 April 1746, the Jacobite army of Charles Edward Stuart was defeated by a British government force under William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland, on Drummossie Moor near Inverness in the Scottish Highlands. It was the last pitched battle fought on British soil.

Monument to the Great Fire of LondonFish St Hill, Bridge, London EC3R 8AH, UK

202 feet (62 m) in heigh, the monument commemorates the Great Fire of London. It stands at the junction of Monument Street and Fish Street Hill, 202 feet west of the spot in Pudding Lane where the Great Fire started on 2 September 1666.