76 Monuments in United Kingdom that you should visit - With photos & details

Get Travalour for free on Google Play

76 Monuments to explore in United Kingdom

The United Kingdom consists of four constituent countries: England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland. It is the sixth-largest economy by nominal GDP and ninth-largest economy by purchasing power parity. It has a high-income economy and has a very high Human Development Index rating, ranking 14th in the world. It was the world's first industrialised country and the world's foremost power during the 19th and early 20th centuries.

Airlie MonumentKirriemuir DD8 4ND, UK

A majestic monument which was erected in memory of the11th Earl of Airlie who was killed in the Boer War on 11th June 1900. The ceremony of laying the memorial stone took place on 2nd September 1901. It is 65 feet high and is 1230 feet above sea level.   It is an important landmark and a focal point for the community of Glen Clova, Glen Prosen, Cortachy and the surrounding area – indeed so prominent that it can be seen for many miles around.

Alloway Auld Kirk40 Alloway, Ayr KA7 4PQ, UK

Alloway Auld Kirk is a Scheduled Ancient Monument and Category A listed ruined church, the associated graveyard is Category B listed. The Kirk and graveyard are best known as the setting for Robert Burns’ poem Tam O’Shanter.

Arbor Low Stone Circle and Gib Hill BarrowLong Rake, Monyash, Derbyshire DE45 1JS, UK

Arbor Low is a Neolithic henge monument atmospherically set amid high moorland . Surrounded by unspoiled countryside with fantastic views over classic Derbyshire scenery. Within an earthen bank and ditch, a circle of some 50 white limestone slabs, all now fallen, surrounds a central stone 'cove' - a feature found only in major sacred sites. There were probably 41-43 stones originally, but some are now in fragments. In the centre of the circle lie at least six smaller blocks, originally believed

AveburyAvebury, Marlborough SN8 1RE, UK

The Avebury complex is one of the principal ceremonial sites of Neolithic Britain that we can visit today. It contains the largest megalithic stone circle in the world. It is both a tourist attraction and a place of religious importance to contemporary pagans. It was built and altered over many centuries from about 2850 BC until about 2200 BC and is one of the largest, and undoubtedly the most complex, of Britain's surviving Neolithic henge monuments.

Big BenWestminster, London SW1A 0AA, UK

When completed in 1859, its clock was the largest and most accurate four-faced striking and chiming clock in the world. The tower stands 315 feet (96 m) tall, and the climb from ground level to the belfry is 334 steps. Its base is square, measuring 39 feet (12 m) on each side. Dials of the clock are 23 feet (7.0 m) in diameter.

Bratton Camp and White HorsePort Way, Bratton, Westbury BA13 4TA, UK

Bratton White Horse is a hill figure on the escarpment of Salisbury Plain, approximately 1.5 mi east of Westbury in Wiltshire, England. Located on the edge of Bratton Downs and lying just below an Iron Age hill fort, it is the oldest of several white horses carved in Wiltshire. It was restored in 1778, an action which may have obliterated another horse that had occupied the same slope. A contemporary engraving from around 1772 appears to show a horse facing in the opposite direction that was rat

Bridgewater MonumentMoneybury Hill, Ringshall, Berkhamsted HP4 1LT, UK

The monument was built in 1832 in memory of the third Duke of Bridgewater who once lived in Ashridge house. As you walk around its York stone base, notice how the monument is dedicated to 'the father of inland navigation' because the duke became famous for building canals during the Industrial Revolution.  One of the iconic monument in this area which shows light to the history of England.

Buckden TowersHigh St, Buckden, Saint Neots PE19 5TA, UK

This was an important residence belonging to the powerful Bishops of Lincoln. The first residence at Buckden would have been built of wood. Around 1225 Bishop Hugh de Wells built a new house of stone. The site was protected by a curtain wall and moat. Within the substantial courtyard and outer yard, comfortable accommodation and facilities, including a chapel, a churchyard, an orchard, and a park, were provided for the bishops and their entourages.

Burns MonumentKay Park, Kilmarnock KA3 7RU, UK

The Burns Monument Centre is a shared venue among East Ayrshire Leisure, East Ayrshire Council and Ayrshire Archives.  The local and family history collections at the Centre are cared for by East Ayrshire Leisure. The collection includes items such as newspapers, maps, historic photographs, books and many other local and family history resources.

Burns MonumentAlloway, Ayr KA7 4PQ, UK

The historical Burns Monument stand on a sloping site on the north bank of the River Doon overlooking the Brig o' Doon. The Monument and Gardens come under the umbrella of the Robert Burns Birthplace Museum. IT was the first memorial built to the memory of the Poet Robert Burns in Ayrshire, and is close to the bank of the River Doon in Alloway. It is situated only half a mile South of the thatched cottage where he was born on 25th January 1759.

Calton HillCalton Hill, Edinburgh EH7 5AA, UK

Calton Hill is one of Edinburgh's main hills, set right in the city centre. It is unmistakable with its Athenian acropolis poking above the skyline. It was situated beyond the east end of Princes Street and included in the city's UNESCO World Heritage Site. Views of, and from, the hill are often used in photographs and paintings of the city. Calton Hill is also the location of several monuments and buildings: the National Monument, the Nelson Monument,the Dugald Stewart Monument, the old Royal H

Castlerigg Stone CircleCastle Ln, Keswick CA12 4RN, UK

Castlerigg is perhaps the most atmospheric and dramatically sited of all British stone circles, with panoramic views and the mountains of Helvellyn and High Seat as a backdrop. It is not just its location that makes this one of the most important British stone circles. Thought to have been constructed about 3000 BC, it is potentially one of the earliest in the country. Taken into guardianship in 1883, it was also one of the first monuments in the country to be recommended for preservation by th

Chanonry PointFortrose IV10 8SD, UK

Chanonry Point lies at the end of Chanonry Ness, a spit of land extending into the Moray Firth. It is one of the best spots in the UK to view bottlenose dolphins from the land. The dolphins are often visible off Chanonry point, particularly on an incoming tide when they play and fish in the strong currents. An active lighthouse is also situated at the tip of the point.

Cherhill White HorseCalne SN11 8XY, UK

The Cherhill White Horse is the second oldest in Wiltshire and was made under the guidance of Dr Christopher Alsop of Calne in 1780, who gave instructions to a team of workers from a distance, using a megaphone. The Cherhill White Horse is one of eight remaining White Horses in Wiltshire. It is located on the edge of Cherhill Down, near both Oldbury Castle and the Lansdowne Monument, three and a half miles from the historic town of Calne.

Chichele CollegeThe College English Heritage, College St, Higham Ferrers, Rushden NN10 8DZ, UK

Chichele College is a rare surviving example of a chantry college. It was founded in 1422 by the locally born Henry Chichele, Archbishop of Canterbury. It’s a very special place; a Scheduled Monument which has considerable historical significance to the town and many who visit the site are enchanted by its spiritual atmosphere.

Clarkson MemorialBridge St, Wisbech PE13 1AE, UK

Clarkson Memorial in Wisbech is a roughly 68 feet high monument commemorating the notable and influential abolitionist Thomas Clarkson. He was a central figure in the campaign against the slave trade in the British empire and instrumental in forming the Society for Effecting the Abolition of the Slave Trade. The memorial consists of a statue mounted on a platform. Above this, rises a canopy, in the form of a spire.

Clava CairnsInverness IV2 5EU, UK

The Clava cairn is a type of Bronze Age circular chamber tomb cairn. There are about 50 cairns of this type in an area round about Inverness. There are two sub-types, one typically consisting of a corbelled passage grave with a single burial chamber linked to the entrance by a short passage and covered with a cairn of stones. In the other sub-type an annular ring cairn encloses an apparently unroofed area with no formal means of access from the outside.

Collingwood MonumentTynemouth, North Shields NE30 4DD, UK

The Collingwood Monument is a Grade II* listed monument in Tynemouth, England, dedicated to Vice Admiral Lord Cuthbert Collingwood. A Napoleonic-era admiral noted for being second-in-command to Admiral Lord Nelson during the Battle of Trafalgar, Collingwood is sometimes referred to as the forgotten hero of Trafalgar. The position of the monument marks Collingwood's family connection with North Shields and allows the statue to be seen from the sea and the river

Culloden BattlefieldCulloden Moor, Inverness IV2 5EU, UK

The Battle of Culloden was the final confrontation of the Jacobite rising of 1745. On 16 April 1746, the Jacobite army of Charles Edward Stuart was defeated by a British government force under William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland, on Drummossie Moor near Inverness in the Scottish Highlands. It was the last pitched battle fought on British soil.

David Livingstone Birthplace165 Station Rd, Blantyre, Glasgow G72 9BY, UK

David Livingstone was a pioneering individual, who rose from humble beginnings in Blantyre, Scotland to become famous for his travels and his  medical and missionary adventures in Africa. A Trust was set up in 1929 to hold and maintain a National Memorial and Museum on the site of Livingstone’s birth, which is made available to the public, providing an interesting, educational and enjoyable cultural experience.