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4 Bridges to explore in Île-de-France

The most populous of the 18 regions of France. It is located in the north-central part of the country and often called the Paris Region because it includes the city of Paris. Île-de-France is densely populated and economically important: it covers only about 2% of France's territory, but has an official estimated population of 12,213,364 (18.2% of the population of France) and accounts for nearly 30% of the French GDP.

Pont Alexandre IIIPont Alexandre III, 75008 Paris, France

The Pont Alexandre III is a bridge crossing the Seine between the 7th and 8th arrondissement of Paris. This site is served by the subway station Invalides and the station Invalides of the RER C line. This site is served by the subway station Invalides and the station Invalides of the RER C line. The bridge was intended to symbolize the Franco - Russian friendship, established by the signing of the alliance concluded in 1891 between the Emperor Alexander III and the president of the French Republ

Pont de Bir-Hakeim75015 Paris, France

The Pont de Bir-Hakeim is a two-level bridge built in the early 20th century. The upper level of the bridge was used by metro line 6, while the lower level is for motor vehicles. This bridge gives a spectacular view of the Eiffel tower. This bridge was built between 1903 and 1905 to replace the earlier steel footbridge that had been constructed for the World Exhibition in 1878. This bridge has been featured in many movies and is a popular destination in this area.

Pont des ArtsPont des Arts, 75006 Paris, France

Pont des Arts were situated between the Institut de France and the Louvre. Built between 1801 and 1804, it was the first iron bridge in Paris. Reserved for pedestrians, the footbridge makes for a pleasant stroll with family and friends. The bridge has sometimes served as a place for art exhibitions and is today a "studio en Plein air" for painters, artists, and photographers who are drawn to its unique point of view.

Pont Neuf75001 Paris, France

The Pont Neuf is considered to be the oldest stone bridge in Paris. Henri IV ordered it to be constructed in 1578. It was designed by Baptiste Du Cerceau and Pierre des Illes, who may have made use of an earlier design by Guillaume Marchand. the Pont-Neuf was the only bridge to span the whole width of the River Seine. It was the only bridge and the first causeway to feature pavements, thus protecting pedestrians from horses and mud.