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4 Botanical Gardens to explore in Île-de-France

The most populous of the 18 regions of France. It is located in the north-central part of the country and often called the Paris Region because it includes the city of Paris. Île-de-France is densely populated and economically important: it covers only about 2% of France's territory, but has an official estimated population of 12,213,364 (18.2% of the population of France) and accounts for nearly 30% of the French GDP.

Jardin des Plantes57 Rue Cuvier, 75005 Paris, France

Jardin des Plantes is a park and a botanical garden open to the public, located in the 5th arrondissement of Paris. It is the seat and the main site of the National Museum of Natural History, which also has other sites in Paris and in the provinces. It also has a menagerie, greenhouses, and scientific exhibition buildings serving as museums and a Paleontology gallery.

Luxembourg Gardens75006 Paris, France

The Luxembourg Gardens, inspired by the Boboli Gardens in Florence, were created upon the initiative of Queen Marie de Medici in 1612 was located on the border between Saint-Germain-des-Prés and the Latin Quarter. This park an ideal place to rest after a long day exploring the city. The park houses several metal benches surrounded by numerous statues and sculptures, a perfect place to relax and enjoy a bit of fresh air.

Trocadéro GardensPlace du Trocadéro et du 11 Novembre, 75016 Paris, France

An open space that has a spectacular garden and provides exceptional views of the Eiffel Tower across the River Seine located in the 16th arrondissement of Paris. This space was built for the 1937 World’s Fair in Paris, the gardens align perfectly with the base of the Eiffel Tower. Today this beautiful space plays a role in popular seasonal events throughout the year. There are also fountains and an array of sculptures and so more to see.

Tuileries GardenPlace de la Concorde, 75001 Paris, France

A famous public garden which was located between the Louvre and the Place de la Concorde in the 1st arrondissement of Paris, France. The Tuileries Gardens take their name from the tile factories which previously stood on the site where Queen Catherine de Medici built the Palais des Tuileries in 1564. it's now a great place for a walk that is much-loved by Parisians and passing visitors, and a marvellous example of the French formal garden.