8 Parks in Merseyside that you should visit - With photos & details

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8 Parks to explore in Merseyside

Merseyside is a metropolitan and ceremonial county in North West England. Visit the home of British glass at the World of Glass museum in St Helens, a fascinating town also known for its rugby league heritage. See wild animals up close and personal at Knowsley Safari Park, take in Anthony Gormley’s unique art installation on Crosby Beach and visit Formby Point to see one of England’s last strongholds for red squirrels – go see before they disappear for good.

Calderstones ParkCalderstones Mansion House, Calderstones Rd, Liverpool L18 3JB, UK

Calderstones Park is a majestic public park that is home to ancient megaliths that are said to be older than Stonehenge, this is in fact what the park is named after. It also features a lake, where youngsters can feed the geese and ducks rice balls! There's also Mansion House, which features a café and a child-friendly play area.

Hesketh Park, Southport17 Park Cres, Brentwood Ct, Southport PR9 9JN, UK

Hesketh Park is one of the largest parks in Southport. Features of the park include The American Garden, The Clock Garden, The Specimen Garden, The Herbaceous Garden and the Mixed Flower Garden and also It offers a short mile walk away and with plenty of on street parking, this picturesque park is a perfect place to lose track of time.

Newsham Park And GardenGardner's Dr, Liverpool L6 7UN, UK

Newsham Park is an 18th-century landscape park, part of which became a public park in 1868.Set in 121 acres, this Grade II listed Victorian park is surrounded by fine period architecture and fishing lakes with roach, carp, and tench. It features a boating lake and a bandstand, among walks, lawns and flowerbeds. An angling permit is required if fishing in park lakes.

Princes Park LabyrinthDevonshire Rd, Liverpool L8 3TZ, UK

Prince's Park in Toxteth, Liverpool, England, is a 45 ha municipal park, 2 mi south east of Liverpool city centre. In 2009, its status was upgraded to a Grade II* Historic Park by English Heritage. With its serpentine lake and a circular carriage drive, the park set a style which was to be widely emulated in Victorian urban development, most notably by Paxton himself on a larger scale at Birkenhead Park. Princes Park also influenced its near neighbour, Sefton Park.

Royden ParkHill Bark Rd, Frankby, Birkenhead, Wirral CH48 1NP, UK

Royden Park is a large area of parkland adjacent to Thurstaston Common, which offers a wide range of activities and facilities.  It comprises over 26 Hectares of mixed deciduous and conifer woodlands, meadows, fishing mere and wetland mere. It has a large lake called Roodee Mere where fishing is allowed with a permit. The old coach house for Hill Bark has been converted for use as a cafe and resource centre. There are conifer woodland walks, meadows with nature walks, car parking, a walled garde

Sefton ParkSefton Park, Liverpool L17, UK

This magnificent 200-acre Park looks like a natural landscape rather than a man-made park.  It was the best known and most loved by locals. Classified as a Grade One listed park by English Heritage.  It features are a boating lake, replica statues of Eros and Peter Pan and a café,  curved paths and driveways and so more. It is a Green Flag and Green Heritage awarded site with beautiful features and monuments.

Stanley Park & GardenWalton Ln, Anfield, Liverpool L4 2SL, UK

Stanley Park is a 110-acre, Grade II listed green space just north of Liverpool city center. It is famous for dividing the home grounds of Liverpool and Everton Football Clubs. The park’s surroundings are dominated by the football stadiums of Liverpool Football Club and Everton Football Club.  It consists of the land consisted of open turfed areas, suitable for sport, with most of the rest being laid out as formal gardens and lakes.

Vale Park, New BrightonVale Park, New Brighton, Wallasey CH45, UK

Vale Park is a historic Victorian park in New Brighton, Merseyside, England. It features formal gardens, a rose garden, and a bandstand. The park opened in 1899 and has hosted weekly brass band concerts through the summer months since the day the park opened. The park has formal gardens, a children's play area, a cafe, toilets, a rose garden, annual bedding displays, open grass areas, a kick about pitch, a fairy garden, and outdoor fitness equipment.