5 Old Ruins in Gloucestershire that you should visit - With photos & details

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5 Old Ruins to explore in Gloucestershire

The cathedral city of Gloucester nestled between the Cotswolds and the Forest of Dean, is Britain’s most inland port, rich with history dating back to Roman times. Gloucester’s many museums and attractions tell the stories of those that have made a great impact on England and the world.

Chedworth Roman VillaYanworth, Cheltenham GL54 3LJ, UK

The stone villa was first built in the early 2nd century and expanded in the 4th century. The luxurious features and precious marble mosaics lead archaeologists to believe the dwelling belonged to a very wealthy and high-status Romano-Briton family. It is one of the largest and most elaborate Roman villas so far discovered in Britain and one with the latest occupation beyond the Roman period.

Great Witcombe Roman VillaBrockworth, Gloucester GL3 4TW, UK

Great Witcombe Roman Villa was one of the largest Roman houses in Britain and was part of a cluster of very wealthy villas in the Cotswolds area. A rich family lived here, together with their slaves and freedmen, for around 200 years, until the end of the Roman period in Britain. The remains include a bathhouse complex and perhaps the shrine of a water spirit. Mosaic pavements hint at the villa’s opulence in Roman times.

Hailes AbbeyHailes, Cheltenham GL54 5PB, UK

One of the beautiful abbeys which was founded in 1246 by the Earl of Cornwall, Hailes Abbey is set amid delightful Cotswold countryside. Once the center of monastic life, the tranquil ruins are now the perfect place to relax and enjoy a picnic in a unique historic setting. Visit the new museum to discover the treasures of Hailes, uncovering stories of the monks who lived and worshipped at the abbey for nearly three centuries.

Sudeley CastleSudeley Castle & Gardens, Cheltenham GL54 5LP, UK

A majestic  Grade I listed Castle located in the Cotswolds. It was the only private castle in England to have a queen buried within the grounds - Queen Katherine Parr, the last and surviving wife of King Henry VIII – who lived and died in the castle. . The castle has 10 notable gardens covering some 15 acres within a 1,200-acre estate nestled within the Cotswold hills.

Tewkesbury AbbeyChurch Street, Tewkesbury GL20 5RZ, UK

Tewkesbury Abbey is world-renowned for being one of the UK’s greatest examples of medieval architecture. Its striking Norman tower and long nave have dominated the Tewkesbury skyline for nearly 900 years. Tewkesbury had been a centre for worship since the 7th century. A priory was established there in the 10th century. The present building was started in the early 12th century.