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35 Forts to explore in England

England

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. The area now called England was first inhabited by modern humans during the Upper Paleolithic period but takes its name from the Angles, a Germanic tribe deriving its name from the Anglia peninsula, who settled during the 5th and 6th centuries. England's economy is one of the largest and most dynamic in the world, with an average GDP per capita of £28,100 or $36,000.

Housesteads Roman Fort - Hadrian's Wall

Housesteads is the best preserved of the thirteen permanent Roman army posts along the length of Hadrian's Wall, the famous barrier built to keep the northern tribes out of the settled Roman south. The site is owned by the National Trust and is in the care of English Heritage. Finds can be seen in the site museum, in the museum at Chesters, and in the Great North Museum: Hancock in Newcastle upon Tyne.

Landguard Fort
Landguard FortView Point Rd, Felixstowe IP11 3TW, UK

Landguard Fort is the site of the last opposed seaborne invasion of England in 1667 and the first land battle of the Royal Marines. The fort was considered part of Essex in the 18th and 19th centuries; births and deaths within the garrison were recorded as 'Landguard Fort, Essex'. It was manned through both World Wars and played an important anti-aircraft role during the Second World War. In 1951 two of the old gun casemates were converted into a 'Cold War' control room. The fort was disarmed a

Lunt Roman Fort
Lunt Roman FortCoventry Rd, Baginton, Coventry CV8 3AJ, UK

Lunt Roman Fort in Baginton was a Roman military camp created in around AD 60 or 61 to deal with the revolt of Boudica and/or its aftermath. It is open to the public and located in the village of Baginton on the south eastern outskirts of Coventry. The fort has now been fully excavated and partially reconstructed; the wooden gateway rebuild was led by archaeologist Margaret Rylatt, using the same tools and techniques that the military engineers of the Roman Army would have used.

Maiden Castle
Maiden CastleMaiden Castle Rd, Dorchester DT2 9PP, UK

One of the largest and most complex Iron Age hillforts in Europe. Its huge multiple ramparts, mostly built in the 1st century BC, once protected hundreds of residents. When it was first built, the gleaming white chalk ramparts would have towered over the surrounding landscape. It is situated just 2 miles south of Dorchester in Dorset. It is truly an amazing place: even after more than 2000 years, the earthworks are immense, some ramparts rising to a height of 6 meters.

National Trust - Bembridge Fort and Downs
National Trust - Bembridge Fort and DownsCulver Down Rd, Sandwich, Sandown PO36 8QY, UK

A majestic fort which was situated on top of Bembridge Down. It was built in the 1860s at the same time as the Needles Old Battery but inside it is very different, both in its layout and general condition. You can still see the remains of 19th-century and First World War fortifications and gun emplacements that took advantage of the high and prominent position of the headland. It is one of the many Palmerston Forts built around Portsmouth during the period of the Second French Empire.

Newcastle Castle
Newcastle CastleCastle Garth, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 1RQ, UK

A majestic medieval fortification in Newcastle upon Tyne, England, built on the site of the fortress that gave the City of Newcastle its name. The most prominent remaining structures on the site are the Castle Keep , the castle's main fortified stone tower, and the Black Gate, its fortified gatehouse. It sits upon ground previously occupied by the Roman fort Pons Aelius, an Anglo-Saxon cemetery and a Norman motte and bailey castle from which the City takes its name. The Castle Keep also boasts a

No Man's Land Fort
No Man's Land FortUnited Kingdom

No Man's Land Fort was one of a chain of four sea forts in the Solent recommended by the Royal Commission on the Defence of the United Kingdom in 1860 and designed to protect Portsmouth dockyard from seaborne attack. As part of an integrated sea based defensive line the massive structure of No Man's Land fort provides a visual reminder of the strategic importance of the Solent in the late 19th century.

Nothe Fort
Nothe FortBarrack Rd, Weymouth DT4 8UF, UK

Nothe Fort, a three-tiered fortification on a raised promontory next to Weymouth Harbour, is an unmistakable landmark in the region. Learn about military history and World War II in its museum, which is mostly set in a labyrinth of subterranean passageways. Enjoy the stunning views of the Jurassic Coast from the picnic areas on the ramparts and newly-opened terrace, or go underground and explore the many tunnels and secret passageways beneath the fort, including the spooky ghost tunnel.

Old Sarum
Old SarumOld Sarum, Salisbury SP4, UK

The massive Iron Age Hillfort of Old Sarum was re-used by the Romans, Saxons and Normans before growing into one of the most flourishing settlements in medieval England. Situated on a hill about 2 miles (3 km) north of modern Salisbury near the A345 road, the settlement appears in some of the earliest records in the country. It is an English Heritage property and is open to the public.

Portland Castle
Portland CastleLiberty Rd, Castletown, Portland DT5 1AZ, UK

Portland fort is an artillery fort which was built for King Henry in 1539-41, together with sand foot castle, to guard the natural anchorage known as portland roads. The castle is located in the northern region of the island, on the edge of Castletown, which was named after the castle. It was constructed to protect against European invaders including the French and Spanish, and re-used in the First and Second World Wars. Overlooking Portland Harbour, magnificent views can be captured it's beaut

Reculver Towers and Roman Fort
Reculver Towers and Roman FortReculver Rd, Herne Bay, Reculver, Herne Bay CT6 6SS, UK

Reculver Towers are a striking pair of 12th-century church towers built within a Roman fort on the very edge of the Wantsum Channel. The most dominant features of this site are the 12th-century towers of the former monastic church, which stand out on the skyline for miles around. Coastal erosion has brought the edge of the beach to the towers, which act as a navigation marker for shipping. Much of the site has now been lost to the sea.

Richborough Roman Fort And Amphitheatre
Richborough Roman Fort And AmphitheatreRichborough Rd, Sandwich CT13 9JW, UK

Richborough is a key site in the history of Roman Britain, used during the entire length of the occupation from the invasion of AD 43 until the end of Roman rule around 410. . Explore the huge stone walls which mark the site of this Saxon Shore fortress, the rolling defensive ditches and impressive foundations showing the scale of this once bustling Roman settlement. The site is now under the care of English Heritage.

Segedunum Roman Fort & Museum
Segedunum Roman Fort & MuseumBuddle St, Wallsend, Newcastle upon Tyne NE28 6HR, UK

Segedunum was a Roman fort at modern-day Wallsend, Tyne and Wear, England, UK. The fort lay at the eastern end of Hadrian's Wall near the banks of the River Tyne, forming the easternmost portion of the wall. It was in use as a garrison for approximately 300 years, from around 122 AD, almost up to 400AD. Today, Segedunum is the most thoroughly excavated fort along Hadrian's Wall, and is operated as Segedunum Roman Fort, Baths and Museum.

Someries Castle
Someries CastleSomeries,, 81 Someries Cottages, Someries, Luton LU2 9PL, UK

Someries Castle is one of the biggest and earliest surviving brick buildings of this type in England and is therefore of great significance. The house is unique in that it is regarded as one of the first brick buildings in England. Demolished in the 1700s, the fine brickwork can still be seen in the remains of the gatehouse. A unique place to visit and you can spend some good time in the history of England.

Tonbridge Castle
Tonbridge CastleCastle St, Tonbridge TN9 1BG, UK

It was a simple fort of earth and timber, thrown up – like hundreds of others – by Norman invaders for self-protection soon after they arrived in 1066. The walls and magnificent gatehouse were added in the 13th century. The defences were badly damaged after the Civil War and it was further demolished in the 1730's although the lower part of the southern walls are still visible along the river. The site was purchased by the local council in 1900, who now use the mansion as offices, and who made t

Map of Forts to explore in England