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32 Bridges to explore in England

England

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. The area now called England was first inhabited by modern humans during the Upper Paleolithic period but takes its name from the Angles, a Germanic tribe deriving its name from the Anglia peninsula, who settled during the 5th and 6th centuries. England's economy is one of the largest and most dynamic in the world, with an average GDP per capita of £28,100 or $36,000.

Avonmouth Bridge
Avonmouth BridgeM5, Bristol BS20, UK

The Avonmouth Bridge is a road bridge that carries the M5 motorway over the River Avon in Somerset, England. The bridge has a total length of 1,388m with a main span of 164m. It also has a separate footpath and cycleway which connects with Avonmouth station. It was one of the architectural wonders in this area and The bridge was built to allow tall ships underneath.

Bridge of Sighs
Bridge of SighsNew College Ln, Oxford OX1 3BL, UK

The Bridge of Sighs is a bridge in Venice, Italy. The enclosed bridge is made of white limestone, has windows with stone bars, passes over the Rio di Palazzo, and connects the New Prison to the interrogation rooms in the Doge's Palace. It was designed by Antonio Contino, whose uncle Antonio da Ponte designed the Rialto Bridge, and it was built in 1600.

Bridge of Sighs
Bridge of SighsSt John's College, St John's St, Cambridge CB2 1TP, UK

Bridge of Sighs was also Called the Ponte Dei Sospiri by locals, this iconic landmark was built in the year 1600 and connects the Doge's Palace to the historic prison across the canal. It is considered one of the most romantic places in Venice, which is no small feat in a city as idyllic as La Serenissima. It was designed by Antonio Contino, whose uncle Antonio da Ponte designed the Rialto Bridge, and it was built in 1600.

Bristol Bridge
Bristol BridgeBristol Bridge, Bristol BS1, UK

Bristol Bridge is a bridge over the floating harbour in Bristol, England, the original course of the River Avon. It is a grade II listed building.

Causey Arch
Causey Arch30 Badgers Wood, Stanley DH9 0LS, UK

Causey Arch bridge over the River Team near Tanfield was built by the Grand Allies in 1726. It is renowned to be the world's oldest surviving single-arch railway bridge. Horse-drawn wagons crossed the arch on Tanfield Railway to transport coal from local mines to the River Tyne. The Arch has been Grade I listed since 1950. It was restored and reinforced in the 1980s. There are a series of scenic public paths around the area and the Causey Burn which runs underneath it.

Clifton Suspension Bridge
Clifton Suspension BridgeBridge Rd, Leigh Woods, Bristol BS8 3PA, UK

Clifton Suspension Bridge is one of Bristol’s most recognizable structures. Designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel. The bridge’s spectacular setting on the cliffs of the Avon Gorge has made it the defining symbol of Bristol, drawing thousands of visitors a year just to stroll across for views of the ancient Avon Gorge, elegant Clifton, and the magnificent city beyond.

Dunham Toll Bridge
Dunham Toll BridgeLincoln NG22, UK

Dunham Bridge is a toll bridge across the River Trent in England. It spans the border between the administrative counties of Nottinghamshire and Lincolnshire to the west and east respectively. One of the engineering marvels in this area and this bridge makes the transportation easy for peoples.

Dunston Staiths
Dunston StaithsTeams, Gateshead NE8, UK

Dunston Staiths on the River Tyne is believed to be the largest timber structure in Europe, at its height, 5.5m tonnes of coal a year was taken by rail from the Durham coalfields and loaded from the staiths onto ships waiting on the river, which transported coal around the British Isles and Internationally. Today, this magnificent feat of architecture stands as a tribute to the ambition of British engineers during the Victorian period.

Elvet Bridge
Elvet BridgeElvet Bridge, Durham DH1 3AF, UK

Elvet Bridge is a stone bridge that crosses the River Wear connecting the peninsula in central Durham and the Elvet area of the city. The bridge has 10 visible arches and further arches hidden under the road. The present Elvet Bridge replaced a slightly earlier one that was in the same location and is one of only three bridges left in England with buildings on them.

Fingle Bridge
Fingle BridgeUnnamed Road, Exeter EX6 6PW, UK

Fingle Bridge is a Grade II * listed early 17th-century bridge across the River Teign near the village of Drewsteignton, in the north-east corner of Dartmoor National Park. The bridge sits in the base of the deep Teign Gorge, between the ancient hillforts of Prestonbury Castle 130 metres. This packhorse bridge has three arches and the two central piers are surrounded by triangular cutwaters extending upwards to form pedestrian refuges.

Fledborough Viaduct
Fledborough ViaductUnnamed Road, Newark, North Clifton, Newark NG23 7AP, UK

Fledborough Viaduct is a former railway viaduct near Fledborough, Nottinghamshire which is now part of the national cycle network. Fledborough Viaduct is situated in Fledborough Holme, close to St George the Martyr's Church, North & South Clifton. Today the railway trackbed eastwards from the site of Fledborough station, across the viaduct, through Clifton to Doddington & Harby forms an off-road part of National Cycle Route 647 which is part of the National Cycle Network.

Folly Bridge
Folly BridgeAbingdon Rd, Oxford OX1 1SW, UK

Folly Bridge is a stone bridge over the River Thames carrying the Abingdon Road south from the centre of Oxford, England. It was erected in 1825–27, to designs of a little-known architect, Ebenezer Perry , who practised in London. The bridge apparently stands at the site of the ford over which oxen could be driven across the Isis, the ancient name of the Thames in the Oxford area.

Framwellgate Bridge
Framwellgate BridgeDurham DH1 3RB, UK

This, Durham's oldest bridge, was constructed in 1127 by Bishop Flambard, a man who did much in the way of constructing public 'buildings' in the city. As a strategic entry point into the city, it was well-defended by the castle to prevent it becoming a military weak-point. The current bridge is of two shallow arches, each with several reinforcing ribs.

Gateshead Millennium Bridge
Gateshead Millennium BridgeS Shore Rd, Gateshead NE8 3BA, UK

Gateshead Millennium Bridge is the world's first and only tilting bridge, and was designed by Ramboll with Wilkinson Eyre. Made of steel and designed with the aid of LUSAS Bridge analysis software, the bridge stands 45m high and spans 105m across the River Tyne to provide a link for pedestrians and cyclists between the newly revived Newcastle quayside and the Gateshead quayside opposite.

High Bridge
High Bridge207 High St, Lincoln LN5 7AU, UK

High Bridge is the oldest bridge in the United Kingdom which still has buildings on it, dating back to 1160AD. The first building to be built on the bridge, that is now part of Lincoln High Street, was a chapel, dedicated to Thomas Becket - a common occurance on Medieval English bridges. Bridges like this were common in the Middle Ages, the best known being London Bridge, but most have long since been demolished because of their obstruction to the river flow and to shipping.

Mathematical Bridge
Mathematical BridgeCambridge CB3 9ET, UK

The Mathematical Bridge is the popular name of a wooden footbridge in the southwest of central Cambridge. This bridge is built with entirely straight timbers, though it maintains an arch shape. This makes for some interesting architectural study while punting down the river below it. The bridge spans a 50-foot river using multiple shorter lengths of timber.

New Bridge
New BridgeNew Bridge, Witney OX29 7QD, UK

New Bridge is a 13th-century bridge carrying the Abingdon–Witney road over the River Thames in Oxfordshire, England, close to the Thames' confluence with the River Windrush. It is one of the two oldest surviving bridges on the Thames, part Grade I and part Grade II*-listed. The bridge is in a rural setting, with a public house at either end: the Maybush Inn on the south bank and the Rose Revived on the other.

Pero's Bridge
Pero's BridgePero's Bridge, Bristol BS1 5UH, UK

Pero's Bridge is a pedestrian footbridge that spans Bristol's floating harbour, and was named in honour of Pero Jones, an enslaved African who lived in Bristol. The bridge was designed by the Irish artist Eilis O'Connell, in conjunction with Ove Arup & Partners engineers and opened in 1999. The most distinctive features of the bridge are the pair of horn-shaped sculptures which act as counterweights for the lifting section.

Pooh Sticks Bridge
Pooh Sticks BridgeUK, Hartfield TN7 4DN, UK

Poohsticks Bridge in Ashdown Forest, East Sussex, was first built in 1907 and provides the setting for the beloved children's novels. The wooden bridge was officially declared closed on Monday after the wooden railing was ripped from the side of the bridge and the uprooted tree was left lying across the river.

Prebends Bridge
Prebends BridgePrebends Bridge, S Bailey, Durham DH1 3EA, UK

Prebends Bridge is a Grade I listed structure and a scheduled monument which was designed by George Nicholson and built from 1772 to 1778. It is one of three masonry structures on the loop of river that surrounds the cathedral, and is now part of the Durham World Heritage Site.

Map of Bridges to explore in England