3 Geological Formations in Highland that you should visit - With photos & details

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3 Geological Formations to explore in Highland

Highland is a council area in the Scottish Highlands and is the largest local government area in the United Kingdom. Though relatively populous for a Scottish council area, it is also sparsely populated. At 9.0 per km2 in 2012, the population density is less than one seventh of Scotland's as a whole.

Corrieshalloch Gorge is a gorge situated about 20 km south of Ullapool, near Braemore in the Scottish Highlands. The gorge is approximately 1.5 km long, 60 m deep, and 10 m wide at its lip. The 46 meter-high Falls of Measach can be viewed from a viewing platform and a Victorian suspension footbridge.

QuiraingQuiraing, Portree IV51 9LA, UK

The Quiraing is a landslip on the eastern face of Meall na Suiramach, the northernmost summit of the Trotternish on the Isle of Skye, Scotland. The whole of the Trotternish Ridge escarpment was formed by a great series of landslips; the Quiraing is the only part of the slip still moving – the road at its base, near Flodigarry, requires repairs each year.

Smoo CaveSmoo Cave, Lairg IV27 4QA, UK

Smoo Cave is a large combined sea cave and freshwater cave. The cave was formed along two geological lines of weakness by a combination of erosion from the sea and an inland underground stream which has formed the innermost chambers. The cave can be thought of as two caves formed by different mechanisms which have joined together over time.