8 Notable Architectures in Greater London that you should visit - With photos & details

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8 Notable Architectures to explore in Greater London

Greater London is a ceremonial county of England that makes up the majority of the London region. This region forms the administrative boundaries of London and is organised into 33 local government districts—the 32 London boroughs and the City of London, which is located within the region but is separate from the county.

Big BenWestminster, London SW1A 0AA, UK

When completed in 1859, its clock was the largest and most accurate four-faced striking and chiming clock in the world. The tower stands 315 feet (96 m) tall, and the climb from ground level to the belfry is 334 steps. Its base is square, measuring 39 feet (12 m) on each side. Dials of the clock are 23 feet (7.0 m) in diameter.

Hampton Court PalaceHampton Ct Way, Molesey, East Molesey KT8 9AU, UK

Along with St James' Palace, it is one of only two surviving palaces out of the many the King Henry VIII owned. The palace has two distinct contrasting architectural styles, domestic Tudor and Baroque. It currently is open to the public displaying many of its original furnitures still in their original position, in addition to the works of art from the Royal Collection.

Hayward GalleryHayward Gallery, South Bank, London SE1 8XZ, UK

An art gallery within the Southbank Centre in central London. Its massive and extensive use of exposed concrete construction are features typical of Brutalist architecture. The Hayward does not house a permanent collection. Instead, it hosts three or four major temporary exhibitions of modern or contemporary artworks each year.

Palace of WestminsterWestminster, London SW1A 0AA, UK

Meeting place for the two houses of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Contains over 1,100 rooms organised symmetrically around two series of courtyards and which has a floor area of 112,476 m2 (1,210,680 sq ft). Part of the New Palace's area of 3.24 hectares (8 acres) was reclaimed from the River Thames, which is the setting of its nearly 300-metre long (980 ft) facade, called the River Front.

St. Paul's CathedralSt. Paul's Churchyard, London EC4M 8AD, UK

Located on Ludgate Hill at the highest point of the City of London. One of the most famous and most recognizable sights of London. Its dome, framed by the spires of Wren's City churches, has dominated the skyline for over 300 years. At 365 feet (111 m) high, it was the tallest building in London from 1710 to 1967.

The Shard32 London Bridge St, London SE1 9SG, UK

Standing 309.6 metres (1,016 ft) high, the 95-storey Shard is the tallest building in the United Kingdom. The glass-clad pyramidal tower has 72 habitable floors, with a viewing gallery and open-air observation deck on the 72nd floor, at a height of 244 metres (801 ft).

Tower of LondonSt Katharine's & Wapping, London EC3N 4AB, UK

Historic castle founded towards the end of 1066. A grand palace early in its history, the Tower has served variously as an armoury, a treasury, a menagerie, the home of the Royal Mint, a public record office, and the home of the Crown Jewels of England. The Tower is a complex of several buildings set within two concentric rings of defensive walls and a moat.

Westminster AbbeyWestminster Abbey, Westminster, London SW1P 3PA, UK

Gothic abbey church which is the traditional place of coronation and burial site for English and, later, British monarchs. It is the burial site of more than 3,300 persons, usually of prominence in British history (including at least sixteen monarchs, eight Prime Ministers, poets laureate, actors, scientists, military leaders, and the Unknown Warrior).