6 Mountain Peaks in Jordan that you should visit - With photos & details

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6 Mountain Peaks to explore in Jordan

Located at the cross roads of Asia, Africa and Europe. Jordan has been repeatedly referred to as an "oasis of stability" in a turbulent region. It has been mostly unscathed by the violence that swept the region following the Arab Spring in 2010. From as early as 1948, Jordan has accepted refugees from multiple neighbouring countries in conflict.

Al Karak CastleAl Karak Hwy، الكرك، Jordan

A large Crusader castle located in al-Karak, Jordan. It is one of the largest crusader castles in the Levant.

Fortress of MachaerusMadaba, Jordan

A fortified hilltop palace, it is the location of the imprisonment and execution of John the Baptist. It was originally built by the Hasmonean king, Alexander Jannaeus (104 BC-78 BC) in about the year 90 BC. The hilltop, which stands about 1,100 meters above Dead Sea level, is surrounded on all sides by deep ravines which provide great natural strength.

Mount Hor - Tomb of Prophet AaronMa'an Governorate, Jordan

Supposed burial place of Aaron, the brother of Moses. Although in Jewish tradition, the location of Aaron's grave, like that of Moses, is shrouded in mystery, the Islamic tradition places it on Mount Hor, near Petra in Jordan.

Mount NeboMount Nebo, Jordan

It is mentioned in the Hebrew Bible as the place where Moses was granted a view of the Promised Land. The West Bank city of Jericho and Jerusalem are visible from the summit on a very clear day.

PetraJordan

The ancient city of Petra, carved on to the mountains of Jabal Al-Madbah. Petra is believed to have been settled as early as 9,000 BC, and it was possibly established in the 4th century BC as the capital city of the Nabataean Kingdom.

Wadi RumWadi Rum Village, Jordan

Known also as the Valley of the Moon, Wadi Rum is a valley cut into the sandstone and granite rock in southern Jordan. It is one of the most popular attractions in Jordan, with deserts and mountains and rock formations. Wadi Rum has been inhabited by many human cultures since prehistoric times, with many cultures–including the Nabataeans–leaving their mark in the form of rock paintings, graffiti, and temples.