228 Iconic Buildings in Ireland that you should visit - With photos & details

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228 Iconic Buildings to explore in Ireland

A country in the north-western Europe. Ireland, or Republic of Ireland shares its only border with Northern Ireland, which is part of the United Kingdom. It is surrounded by the ocean in all it's other sides. About 40% of the countries 5 million population lives in the greater city area of Dublin.

Adare Desmond CastleLimerick Road, Gortaganniff, Adare, Co. Limerick, Ireland

The Desmond Castle is located on the edge of the village of Adare, just off the N21 on the main Limerick to Kerry road.  The castle was erected with an ancient ring-fort around the early part of the 13th century. It became a strategic fortress during the following turbulent years. It was the property of the Earls of Kildare for nearly 300 years until the rebellion in 1536, when it was forfeited and granted to the Earls of Desmond who gave the castle its present name.

Antrim CastleCastle Rd, Antrim, UK

A majestic castle in Antrim, on the banks of the Sixmilewater River. It was erected in stages between 1613 and 1662. It was destroyed by fire in 1922 and finally demolished in the 1970s. All that remain are a slightly raised grassed platform as well as a freestanding Italian stair tower which was built in 1887 and a gatehouse, which was built around 1818 with twin neo-Tudor towers, with older connecting walls. The gardens are a popular tourist attraction on the Randalstown Road, Antrim.

Antrim Round Tower14 Steeple Rd, Antrim BT41 1BL, UK

Antrim Round Tower was built around the 10th century and is one of the finest towers of its kind in Ireland. It is 28 metres tall and was built as part of a Monastic settlement. It is impressive reminders of Antrim’s ancient monastic settlement. The monastic site was burned in 1147.

Archbishop's Palace, ArmaghArmagh BT60 4EL, UK

The Archbishop’s Palace, Armagh, Northern Ireland, is a landmark Neo-Classical building located on 300 acres of parkland just south of the centre of the city. The building served as primary residence of the Church of Ireland Archbishops of Armagh for over two hundred years, from 1770 to 1975, and thereafter as headquarters of Armagh City and District Council from then until April 2015 when that local authority was replaced following the reform of local government.

Archdiocese of ArmaghAra Coeli, Cathedral Rd, Armagh BT61 7QY, UK

The Archdiocese of Armagh is an Irish Roman Catholic archdiocese. The ordinary is the Roman Catholic Archbishop of Armagh who is also the Metropolitan of the Ecclesiastical province of Armagh and the Primate of All Ireland. The mother church is St Patrick's Cathedral. The claim of the archdiocese to pre-eminence in Ireland as the primatial see rests upon its traditional establishment by Saint Patrick circa 445. It was recognised as a metropolitan province in 1152 by the Synod of Kells.

Ardee CastleArdee Castle, Castle St, Dawsonsdemesne, Ardee, Co. Louth, Ireland

Ardee Castle is significant for being the largest fortified medieval Tower House in Ireland.The Castle was built in the 15th century by John St. Leger and served as a stronghold for the defence of the Pale.  Ardee Castle is the largest fortified medieval Tower House in Ireland or Britain. The castle was originally built by Roger de Peppard in 1207, but not much is left from the original walls.

Ardfinnan CastleCommons, Co. Tipperary, Ireland

Ardfinnan Castle, is the sister castle of Lismore Castle and was built circa 1185 to guard the river crossing at Ardfinnan in County Tipperary, Ireland. The Anglo-Norman castle is positioned on a large rocky incline and it looks out over the Suir valley with the Knockmealdown Mountains to the south, and the Galtee Mountains to the northwest. The castle is a parallelogram in shape with square battlements at the corners and a fortified entrance gateway.

Ardmore Round Tower43 Dubh Carrig, Dysert, Ardmore, Co. Waterford, P36 X735, Ireland

The Ardmore Round Tower is one of the best-preserved examples in Ireland. Situated in the middle of a still-used Cemetery. It is a complete tower but the conical cap is not the original. The 12th century tower has three clearly visible string courses and each course is offset, this plus the inclination or batter of the walls give the tower it's distinctive tapered shape. The sandstone blocks are dressed to the curve. The tower has a total of 7 windows and a decorated.

Armagh Robinson Library43 Abbey St, Armagh BT61 7DY, UK

This is the oldest library in Northern Ireland, founded in 1771 by Archbishop Richard Robinson as part of his plans to establish a university. Carved in stone above the Library’s public entrance is the original Greek inscription meaning “the healing place of the soul”, a message that still resonates today. There are some 42,000 printed works, covering subjects such as early medicine, science, history, law, politics, theology and travel, as well as maps and atlases.

Athassel PrioryL3101, Athasselabbey North, Golden, Co. Tipperary, Ireland

Athassel Priory is the largest medieval priory in Ireland, stretching over a 4-acre site. The priory dates back to the late 12th century.  The priory was burnt twice, once in 1329 by Brian King of Thomond and again in 1581 by John Fitzgerald of Desmond. A large town had grown up around the priory but was destroyed during the two raids. The priory was finally dissolved in 1537 and the lands given to Thomas Butler, 10th Earl of Ormond, who neglected the abbey, and it subsequently fell into ruin.

Athcarne CastleAthcarne, Co. Meath, Ireland

This is an Elizabethan castle now in ruins, located near Duleek in County Meath. It was constructed by William Bathe in 1590 and was then rebuilt in 1830. The castle was abandoned in the 1950s and is now in a sorry state of repair. It is claimed that King James II once owned the castle and that he stayed there in 1690 when en route to the Battle of the Boyne. Some say that his ghost returns to the castle on occasions and appears dumbfounded.

Athclare CastleM1, Athclare, Co. Louth, Ireland

Athclare Castle is typical of defensive residential architecture of the period. This sixteenth-century tower house was built by the Barnewell family and later extended in the seventeenth century, the plain extension is distinguished by the stocky tower to the east. Athclare has been extended and adapted in the centuries since its construction and is classified as a site of National social historical importance by the Irish National Inventory of Architectural Heritage.

Athlumney CastleConvent Rd, Athlumney, Navan, Co. Meath, Ireland

Athlumney Castle is a tower house and fortified house and a National Monument in Navan, Ireland.  The motte at Athlumney was built in the years after 1172 when Hugh de Lacy, Lord of Meath granted the title of Baron Skryne to his ally Adam de Feypo; he in turn granted Athlumney to a relative Amauri de Feipo, who built the motte. The older part of Athlumney Castle is a tower house built in the 15th century.

Aughnanure CastleAughnanure, Oughterard, Co. Galway, H91 PX20, Ireland

Aughnanure Castle was built in the 16th century as a stronghold of the O'Flaherty clan, and is renowned for its unusual double bawn. The castle was built by the O'Flaherty family in the 16th century, one of Connacht's most notable lord families. Aughnanure is one of over 200 tower houses in County Galway, constructed mainly by Gaelic and Anglo-Norman land owning families. The tower lies close to the shores of Lough Corrib, and translates to "the field of the yews" in Irish.

Avondale HouseAvondale House, Avondale, Rathdrum, Co. Wicklow, A67 P303, Ireland

Avondale House,is the birthplace and home of Charles Stewart Parnell. It is set in the Avondale Forest Park, approximately 1.5 km from the nearby town of Rathdrum. The House is now a museum open to visitors, who are introduced to the house by an audio visual presentation. Other facilities include a restaurant, book shop, picnic areas, children's play area, two orienteering courses. In the surrounding parkland are tree trails and walks ranging in duration from one to five hours.

Avondale House and Forest ParkAvondale House and Forest Park, Co. Wicklow, Ireland

Avondale House, birthplace and home of Charles Stewart Parnell , is set in a magnificent 500 acre forest park near Rathdrum in County Wicklow. The river Avonmore flows through the park on its way towards the Irish Sea. The House is now a museum. This interesting Georgian house was built in 1777, and contains fine original plasterwork and the Parnell family furniture.

Ballinafad CastleGortalough, Ballinafad, Co. Sligo, Ireland

Ballinafad Castle was built in 1590 and is also known as the ‘Castle of the Curlews’. The castle is in ruins and is accessible year round. There are no tours, guides, or fees. Visitors can park in a small lot at the foot of the hill where they will find an interpretive sign.  Visitors cannot enter the castle, but the interior is visible through breaches in the walls that are closed off by iron fences.

Ballinalacken CastleBallynalackan, Co. Clare, Ireland

Ballinalacken Castle is a two-stage tower house located in Killilagh parish of County Clare, Ireland. It is of uncertain date but most likely was built in the 15th or early 16th century. The current tower house resembles Leamaneh Castle in that it was constructed over a prolonged period. The oldest part is the tall eastern tower, likely built in the 15th century. It is located in the region known as the Burren on a limestone outcrop overlooking the roads from Lisdoonvarna to Fanore and Doolin.

Ballyadams CastleBallyadams, Co. Laois, Ireland

One of the most hidden of castles that dot the landscape of Ireland, right close to my aunt's house in Ballyadams, and seat to The O'Mores. According to Keating, the O'Mores have St. Fintan as their protector. Of thirteen families of Moore recorded in Burke's Landed Gentry.

Ballycowan Castle53.276419,-7.558745, Ballycowan, Co. Offaly, Ireland

Ballycowan Castle is a castle located 4 km west of Tullamore, Co. Offaly. It was built in 1589 as a fortified house by Thomas Morres.The castle was built on the previous site of the O’Molloy castle or tower house called Baile-mhic-Abhainn which was destroyed by a fire in 1557.