5 Old Ruins in Indonesia that you should visit - With photos & details

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5 Old Ruins to explore in Indonesia

World's largest island country, with more than seventeen thousand islands.

Benteng Somba OpuJl. Daeng Tata No.Kelurahan, Benteng Somba Opu, Kec. Barombong, Kabupaten Gowa, Sulawesi Selatan 90224, Indonesia

Fort Somba Opu was a fortified commercial center of the Gowa Sultanate. The fort was the center of the Gowa Sultanate in the 16th-century until its destruction by the Dutch East India Company in 1669. The fort was reconstructed in 1990. A 9-meter cannon has been discovered in the fort, as well as other artifacts that were collected within a nearby site museum.

Bukit SiguntangBukit Lama, Ilir Barat I, Palembang City, South Sumatra 30137, Indonesia

Seguntang Hill is small hill located in Palembang, South Sumatra, Indonesia. This hill is home for archeological relics that related to Sriwijaya Empire, during 6th to 13th Century ago. One of the archeological relics that been discovered at this place is a Buddha Statue in 1920.

Plaosan TempleJl. Candi Plaosan, Plaosan Lor, Bugisan, Kec. Prambanan, Kabupaten Klaten, Jawa Tengah 57454, Indonesia

Plaosan temple was built in the mid 9th century by Sri Kahulunnan or Pramodhawardhani, the daughter of Samaratungga, descendant of Sailendra Dynasty. The temple is an ancient building compound comprising of two building complexes, Plaosan Lor Temple complex and Plaosan Kidul Temple complex.

Sewu TempleJl. Raya Solo - Yogyakarta No.KM.16, Bugisan, Kec. Prambanan, Kabupaten Sleman, Daerah Istimewa Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Sewu temple is the second largest Buddhist temple complex in Indonesia located 800 metres north of Prambanan in Central Java, Indonesia. There are 249 buildings in the complex are arranged in a Mandala pattern around the main central hall. This configuration expresses the Mahayana Buddhist view of the universe.

Taman Wisata Kerajaan SriwijayaJl. Syakyakirti, Karang Anyar, Kec. Gandus, Kota Palembang, Sumatera Selatan, Indonesia

It is the ancient remnants of a garden and habitation area near the northern bank of the Musi river within Palembang, South Sumatra, Indonesia. Several artifacts, such as Buddhist statues, beads, pottery, and Chinese ceramics are found in this area, confirming that the site was related to a 9th-century settlement.