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Owens-Thomas House & Slave Quarters - 4 Things to Know Before Visiting

124 Abercorn St, Savannah, GA 31401, USA

Iconic Buildings
Notable Architectures

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About Owens-Thomas House & Slave Quarters

The Owens–Thomas House & Slave Quarters is a historic home in Savannah, Georgia, that is operated as a historic house museum by Telfair Museums. An impressive two-story structure on a raised basement, it was completed in 1819 for Richard Richardson, an entrepreneur, shipping merchant, and domestic slave trader, and his wife, Frances Bolton Richardson. The Owens–Thomas House was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1976, as one of the nation's finest examples of English Regency architecture


Attractions Near Owens-Thomas House & Slave Quarters

Oglethorpe Square
Oglethorpe Square0.07km from Owens-Thomas House & Slave Quarters

This charming community has all the character of a small town but offers big-city amenities minutes away. Residents have access to restaurants, bars, cultural attractions and shopping centers. There is plenty to do, from cycling and walking along the Savannah River to enjoying regular events and festivals at nearby Forsyth Park. The historic building architecture provides a unique backdrop for those exploring the area - from grand old antebellum homes to interesting Victorian style buildings.

Davenport House Museum
Davenport House Museum0.12km from Owens-Thomas House & Slave Quarters

The Isaiah Davenport House is a historic home in Savannah, Georgia, United States, built-in 1820. It has been operated as a historic house museum by the Historic Savannah Foundation since 1963.

Columbia Square
Columbia Square0.13km from Owens-Thomas House & Slave Quarters

Columbia Square is a beautiful community Sitting along the banks of the Wilmington River, it is teeming with outdoor activities and breathtaking views. From biking trails and canoeing to exploring nearby beaches and state parks, Columbia Square offers something for everyone looking to enjoy nature and the outdoors. Just a short drive away from downtown Savannah's hustle and bustle, locals have no problem striking a balance between city living and an escape into nature's warmth.

Reynolds Square
Reynolds Square0.22km from Owens-Thomas House & Slave Quarters

It's a suburb of Savannah, the birthplace of Girl Scouts and one of the oldest cities in America. Madison Square has something for everyone: plenty of eateries nearby for those looking for a good meal and delightful parks for kids to play in. There are hiking trails that wind through stunning natural scenery as well, providing great spots for family picnics or romantic dates. The area is also home to two gorgeous golf courses and numerous shops along the main street.

The Olde Pink House
The Olde Pink House0.25km from Owens-Thomas House & Slave Quarters

The Olde Pink House is an icon of Southern hospitality and charm. Built in 1771 by James Habersham, the house has undergone extensive renovations over the centuries, but it still retains its original class and elegance. Every detail of this grand red rococo mansion exudes timeless beauty and grace - from the hand-stenciled walls to the Italian marble fireplaces. The stately columns provide a majestic backdrop for exquisite meals served in lavish dining rooms with crystal chandeliers.

Colonial Park Cemetery
Colonial Park Cemetery0.26km from Owens-Thomas House & Slave Quarters

The Colonial Park Cemetery, one of Savannah’s most beautiful restorations, is the final resting place for many of Savannah's earliest citizens. Established about 1750, it was the original burial ground for the Christ Church Parish.

Where is Owens-Thomas House & Slave Quarters

Discover More Attractions in Chatham County, Where Owens-Thomas House & Slave Quarters Is Located

Chatham County
Chatham County
64 attractions

Chatham County is the northernmost of Georgia's coastal counties on the Atlantic Ocean. It is bounded on the northeast by the Savannah River, and in the southwest bounded by the Ogeechee River.

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