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Slane Abbey - Things to Know Before Visiting

Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland

Churches
Old Ruins

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About Slane Abbey

Slane Abbey is the ruins on the Hill of Slane, Ireland where Saint Patrick infamously lit his bonfire during the pagan festival of Ostara, directly opposite the Hill of Tara. The current ruins include 1512 CE reconstructions of the monastic Abbey.


Attractions Near Slane Abbey

Littlewoods Forest
Littlewoods Forest1.13km from Slane Abbey

Littlewood is a forest covering 28 hectares. Today it comprises a varied mix of conifer and broadleaved tree species. The trees were planted by the Slane estate sometime before 1840. Most of the trees planted were broadleaved, primarily oak which was such a valuable building timber – large stumps of oak are common throughout the forest.

Slane Castle
Slane Castle1.47km from Slane Abbey

Slane Castle, set in the middle of a 1,500 acre estate in the heart of the Boyne Valley, County Meath, and is the perfect venue to host your family, friends, wedding, gala dinner, conference or corporate function. It holds the Slane Festival within its grounds, with the Irish Independent claiming in 2004 that "Slane today is the kind of internationally recognised venue that can claim even Madonna's attention". Its sloping lawns form a natural amphitheatre.

Ledwidge Cottage Museum
Ledwidge Cottage Museum1.51km from Slane Abbey

The Ledwidge Cottage Museum commemorates the Irish poet, political activist, nationalist and war hero Francis Ledwidge (1887-1917). The cottage is the family home where Ledwidge was the eight of nine children who grew up in poverty. It is a perfect example of a 19th Century farm labourer's cottage and was purchased and restored by the Francis Ledwidge Museum Committee in 1981.

Knowth
Knowth3.65km from Slane Abbey

Knowth is a Neolithic passage grave and an ancient monument of the World Heritage Site of Brú na Bóinne located 8.4 km west of Drogheda in Ireland's valley of the River Boyne. It is the largest passage grave of the Brú na in diameter,covering roughly a hectare. It contains two passages placed along an east-west line and is encircled by 127 kerbstones, of which three are missing, and four badly damaged.

Newgrange
Newgrange5.09km from Slane Abbey

Newgrange is a 5,200 year old passage tomb located in the Boyne Valley in Ireland's Ancient East. It is surrounded by 97 large stones called kerbstones some of which are engraved with megalithic art; the most striking is the entrance stone. It is an exceptionally grand passage tomb built during the Neolithic period, around 3200 BC, making it older than Stonehenge and the Egyptian pyramids.

Old Mellifont Abbey
Old Mellifont Abbey5.76km from Slane Abbey

This is the first Cistercian monastery in Ireland. St Malachy of Armagh created it in 1142 with the help of a small number of monks sent by St Bernard from Clairvaux. It has several extraordinary architectural features, the foremost of which is the two-storey octagonal lavabo. Today, the ruined abbey is a National monument of Ireland and accessible to the public.

Where is Slane Abbey

Discover More Attractions in Meath, Where Slane Abbey Is Located

Meath
Meath
35 attractions

Meath is the 14th-largest of Ireland's 32 counties by area, and the eighth-largest in terms of population. In terms of natural attractions, the county has a relatively tame landscape compared to other parts of Ireland, with no mountains, a short coastline and generally little forest cover. There are however a number of National Parks and Wildlife Service protected sites within county.

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