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Battle of the Boyne Visitor Centre - Things to Know Before Visiting

Battle of the Boyne Visitor Centre, Drybridge, Co. Meath, Ireland

Museums
Old Ruins

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About Battle of the Boyne Visitor Centre

The Visitor Centre is housed in the restored 18th century Oldbridge House on the banks of the River Boyne. It gives an in-depth insight into the battle between King William III and his father-in-law King James II in 1690. Explore the colourful tale of the Battle of the Boyne through detailed displays and historical reenactments.


Attractions Near Battle of the Boyne Visitor Centre

Mary McAleese Boyne Valley Bridge
Mary McAleese Boyne Valley Bridge1.54km from Battle of the Boyne Visitor Centre

The Mary McAleese Boyne Valley Bridge is a cable-stayed bridge 3km west of Drogheda spanning the Boyne and the county boundaries of Meath and Louth. The bridge is tolled and forms part of the M1 motorway which links Dublin and Belfast. This bridge is known for its beautiful architecture and has been built taking the environment into consideration. Earlier known as River Boyne bridge, this bridge was given its present name in 2012 and is named after Irish president Mary McAleese.

Townley Hall
Townley Hall2.57km from Battle of the Boyne Visitor Centre

Townley Hall is a magnificent Georgian mansion built just over 200 years ago on a hilltop setting. Today it is surrounded by 60 acres of rolling parkland overlooking the Boyne Valley, very close to the site of the famous battle. The house is now owned by the School of Philosophy and Economic Science, a registered charity based in Ballsbridge Dublin, who use it as a residential study centre.

Dowth Passage Tomb
Dowth Passage Tomb2.98km from Battle of the Boyne Visitor Centre

A 5,500-year-old passage tomb uncovered at Dowth Hall in the heart of the Brú na Bóinne World Heritage site in Co Meath is “the most significant megalithic find in Ireland in the last 50 years”, archaeologists believe. It is less developed as a tourist attraction than its neighbours, partly because the chamber is much lower, and partly because the decoration is less visible.

Brú na Bóinne
Brú na Bóinne3.48km from Battle of the Boyne Visitor Centre

Brú na Bóinne is one of the most important prehistoric megalithic sites in Europe drawing thousands of visitors daily. Each of the tombs has their own myths to explore against the beautiful backdrop of the gently meandering River Boyne. The archaeological landscape within Brú na Bóinne is dominated by the three well-known large passage tombs, Knowth, Newgrange and Dowth, built some 5,000 years ago in the Neolithic or Late Stone Age.

Old Mellifont Abbey
Old Mellifont Abbey3.78km from Battle of the Boyne Visitor Centre

This is the first Cistercian monastery in Ireland. St Malachy of Armagh created it in 1142 with the help of a small number of monks sent by St Bernard from Clairvaux. It has several extraordinary architectural features, the foremost of which is the two-storey octagonal lavabo. Today, the ruined abbey is a National monument of Ireland and accessible to the public.

Newgrange
Newgrange 4.17km from Battle of the Boyne Visitor Centre

Newgrange is a Stone Age monument in the Boyne Valley, County Meath, Ireland. It was built about 3,200 BC (5,200 years ago) during the Neolithic period, which makes it older than Stonehenge and the Egyptian pyramids. The site consists of a large circular mound with an inner stone passageway and chambers. Human bones and possible grave goods or votive offerings were found in these chambers. The mound has a retaining wall at the front, made mostly of white quartz cobblestones.

Where is Battle of the Boyne Visitor Centre

Discover More Attractions in Louth, Where Battle of the Boyne Visitor Centre Is Located

Louth
Louth
50 attractions

County Louth is located in the north-east corner of the Republic of Ireland. Louth is Ireland's smallest county but contains a diverse landscape from the mountainous Cooley peninsula in the east to the gently rolling drumlin hills.

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