National Trust - Woolsthorpe Manor in Rutland, England, United Kingdom - get details, & find more attractions to visit nearby

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National Trust - Woolsthorpe Manor

Woolsthorpe Manor, Water Ln, Grantham NG33 5PD, UK

Iconic Buildings

About National Trust - Woolsthorpe Manor

Woolsthorpe Manor is a typical early 17th-century yeoman’s farmhouse, built some time after 1623. It is the birthplace and was the family home of Sir Isaac Newton. He was born there on 25 December 1642. At that time it was a yeoman's farmstead, principally rearing sheep. Now in the hands of the National Trust and open to the public all year round, it is presented as a typical seventeenth century yeoman's farmhouse.


Attractions near National Trust - Woolsthorpe Manor

Woolsthorpe Manor House0.02km from National Trust - Woolsthorpe Manor

Woolsthorpe Manor is a typical early 17th-century yeoman’s farmhouse, where Sir Isaac Newton had his famous revelation about gravity. Explore the orchard with the original 400-year-old tree from which the apple fell and inspired Newton. built some time after 1623. Newton returned here in 1666 when Cambridge University closed due to the plague, and here he performed many of his most famous experiments, most notably his work on light and optics.

Easton Walled Gardens2.36km from National Trust - Woolsthorpe Manor

Easton Walled Gardens were abandoned from 1951 when Easton Hall was demolished. Renovation work on the 12 acres of gardens started in 2002. There is a Yew Tunnel, Cut Flower Garden, Cottage Garden, Turf Maze and two glasshouses. President Franklin Roosevelt described this garden as...'A dream of Nirvana..almost too good to be true.' The garden is as interesting for the planting as its long history.

Yew Tree Avenue And Wood9.27km from National Trust - Woolsthorpe Manor

Yew Tree Avenue is a unique collection of 150 yew trees, most over 200 years old. The Avenue was once the carriage drive to Clipsham Hall, the centre of the Clipsham Estate. The trees are managed by the Forestry Commission, and thanks to the work of Clipsham Yew Tree Avenue Trust, are currently undergoing renovation after years of little maintenance.

Rocks By Rail Living Ironstone Museum11.23km from National Trust - Woolsthorpe Manor

Rocks by Rail – formerly know as Rutland Railway Musuem, is situated 4 miles from Oakham and tells the local story of how private  railways were used in the local ironstone extraction industry to move the extracted stone on the first part of its journey to the distant steelworks. The museum has a large collection of historic railway vehicles, many of them driven by steam. Included in the collection are coaches, vans, wagons, and locomotives.

Grantham Museum11.29km from National Trust - Woolsthorpe Manor

Grantham Museum is located at St Peter's Hill, Grantham, Lincolnshire, England in the building provided for it in 1926. It interprets the town through its archaeology, various aspects of post-medieval life, local trades and industries. The basis of the collection is material provided by Henry Preston, the first Curator and Founder, and twentieth century additions included material about Sir Isaac Newton, Edith Smith and Margaret Thatcher.

St Wulframs Church11.69km from National Trust - Woolsthorpe Manor

St Wulfram's Church, Grantham, is a parish church in the Church of England in Grantham in Lincolnshire. The church has been a Grade I listed building, since 8 May 1950. This was clearly a church of importance by that time, and the pillars in the eastern part of the nave survive from a Norman cruciform church. The earliest church on this site was built in the early Saxon period and a church was recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086. You can still see Saxon herringbone stonework near the organ.

Where is National Trust - Woolsthorpe Manor

Discover more attractions in Rutland, where National Trust - Woolsthorpe Manor is located

Rutland42 attractions

Rutland is a landlocked county in the East Midlands of England, bounded to the west and north by Leicestershire, to the northeast by Lincolnshire and the southeast by Northamptonshire. It is England’s smallest and arguably prettiest county and is the perfect place to spend time enjoying the great outdoors.