More things to explore near Mill Green Museum and Mill

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Attractions to explore nearby Mill Green Museum and Mill

Mill Green Museum and MillBush Hall Ln, Mill Green, Hatfield AL9 5PD, UK

Mill Green Museum is a restored 18th century working flour mill powered by water to produce flour and demonstrate historic milling practices. Its heart is a working watermill, with 18th and 19th century wooden machinery restored to full working order. It is in regular use to grind organic wheat for a local bakery and for retail sale. Visitors can explore the mill, see it working and chat to the miller on duty. Flour is sold in various sizes.

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Hatfield House1.38 KMs away from Mill Green Museum and Mill

A majestic castle built by Robert Cecil, 1st Earl of Salisbury and Chief Minister to King James I, from 1607 to 1611. There is a marvellous collection of pictures, furnishings and historic armour on display. The estate has been in the Cecil family for 400 years - one of England's foremost political families. Hatfield House is the home of the 7th Marquess of Salisbury.

Stanborough Park1.54 KMs away from Mill Green Museum and Mill

A majestic and beautiful countryside park, with 2 lakes covering an area of 126 acres, on the outskirts of Welwyn Garden City, Hertfordshire. Home of Stanborough Park Activity Centre, on the South Lake you can experience Sailing, Kayaking, Canoeing and Stand Up Paddleboarding in one of our many activity sessions. The whole park is completely man-made from an old quarry site creating the lakes and the hills around them.

Hatfield Park1.68 KMs away from Mill Green Museum and Mill

Hatfield House in Hertfordshire, just 21 miles north of London, is a fine Jacobean House and Garden in a spectacular countryside setting. It is a prime example of Jacobean architecture. The estate includes extensive grounds and surviving parts of an earlier palace. The house, currently the home of 7th Marquess of Salisbury, is open to the public.

Welwyn Roman Baths6.19 KMs away from Mill Green Museum and Mill

Welwyn Roman Baths is a 3rd-century bath complex that formed part of the Dicket Mead Roman villa. The baths lie directly underneath the A1(M) motorway, protected by a steel vault. The baths were a small part of the Dicket Mead villa, which was originally built in the 3rd century AD.

Heartwood Forest6.93 KMs away from Mill Green Museum and Mill

Heartwood Forest is an extraordinary and special place that has transformed a vast area of former farmland in London’s greenbelt. It is home to over half a million new saplings, stunning ancient woodland, a native arboretum and a community orchard. Incredibly, it takes just 12 years to turn bare land into flourishing native woodland, complete with a diverse range of wildlife and towering trees.

Panshanger Park7.00 KMs away from Mill Green Museum and Mill

Panshanger Park is a 1,000-acre site situated between Welwyn Garden City and Hertford. It was a heaven for the prople and wildlife. The park contains the largest maiden oak in the country, with a circumference of 7.6 meters. It is believed to have been planted by Queen Elizabeth I. Acorns from the tree have been used as seedlings for notable oaks in other parts of the country, such as the Prince Consort Oak in the Forest of Dean. Winston Churchill planted a sapling from the tree in the park and

De Havilland Aircraft Museum Car Park8.30 KMs away from Mill Green Museum and Mill

De Havilland Aircraft Museum is an organization set up to preserve Aircraft and other aviation related products produced by Sir Geoffrey deHavilland and his design team. The collection is built around the definitive prototype and restoration shops for the de Havilland Mosquito and also includes several examples of the de Havilland Vampire – the third operational jet aircraft in the world. The museum is the largest such museum devoted to one manufacturer in the country.

National Trust - Shaw's Corner8.32 KMs away from Mill Green Museum and Mill

Shaw's Corner was the primary residence of the renowned Irish playwright George Bernard Shaw; The house was designed very much in the Arts and Crafts style with stained glass windows and hearts cut into the banisters. It tells the story of his life and gives a great description of much of his life. The Arts and Crafts interiors are small yet beautiful. The garden contains a revolving summerhouse where Shaw used to work.

Hertford Museum9.08 KMs away from Mill Green Museum and Mill

Hertford Museum was established by brothers Robert Thornton Andrews and William Frampton Andrews in 1903. The Museum cares for in excess of 100,000 objects. Collections include archaeology, paper ephemera, ethnography, fine art, geology, natural history, photographs, social history and the Hertfordshire Regiment collection.

Broxbourne Woods9.11 KMs away from Mill Green Museum and Mill

The woods are part of a wider, very large area of Sessile Oak and Hornbeam woodland at the northern most part of its natural range. Both woods contain protected Sites of Special Scientific Interest, one area in Broxbourne Wood undergoing significant restoration to a more open landscape with grazing animals.

Hartham Common9.32 KMs away from Mill Green Museum and Mill

Hartham Common is a large well established public open space in the center of Hertford, comprising wildlife-rich river corridors, cattle-grazed meadows, and a network of paths and various recreational facilities. It is now owned and managed by East Herts Council. Next, the leisure centre is a popular fenced children's playground. There is also a skate park which is similarly popular with teenagers.

The Clock Tower9.70 KMs away from Mill Green Museum and Mill

St Albans' Clock Tower is the only surviving medieval town belfry in England and is designated as a Scheduled Ancient Monument. the tower had a mechanical clock, which would have been a very rare and expensive piece of machinery at the time. The Clock Tower is 19.6 metres (64 ft) high, and has 5 floors including the roof.

The Cathedral & Abbey Church of Saint Alban9.85 KMs away from Mill Green Museum and Mill

St Albans Cathedral is the Shrine to Britain's first saint, is the oldest site of continuous Christian worship in Britain. The building’s amazing mixture of architectural styles bears witness to the many centuries of its life, first as a monastic Abbey and now as a Cathedral. The church, although legally a cathedral, differs in certain ways from most of the other cathedrals in England. It is also used as a parish church, of which the Dean is rector. He has the same powers, responsibilities, and