Beatrix Potter Gallery and Hawkshead in Cumbria, England, United Kingdom - get details, & find more attractions to visit nearby

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Beatrix Potter Gallery and Hawkshead

Main St, Hawkshead, Ambleside LA22 0NS, UK

Art Galleries

About Beatrix Potter Gallery and Hawkshead

The Beatrix Potter Gallery in Hawkshead is one of the National Trust‘s more unusual properties in that it has an interesting link with Beatrix Potter herself. On display are original sketches and watercolors painted by Potter for her children's stories as well as artifacts and information relating to her life and work. The display changes annually. The 17th-century building is listed as grade II. It was at one time the law office of Potter's husband, William Heelis. Its interior remains substant



Attractions near Beatrix Potter Gallery and Hawkshead

Esthwaite Water1.52km from Beatrix Potter Gallery and Hawkshead

A beautiful natural 280-acre private water situated in the heart of the English Lake District with excellent facilities for boat or bank fishing. The lake has a mean depth of 6.9m, covers an area of 0.96km² and its drainage area forms part of the larger Windermere catchment. It is designated both as a Natural England Site of Special Scientific Interest and as a Ramsar Convention site on account of its diverse macrophyte community and the well developed hydrosere at the northern end of the lake.

Grizedale Forest2.28km from Beatrix Potter Gallery and Hawkshead

Grizedale Forest is in the heart of the Lake District between Windermere and Coniston. Head for Hawkshead and climb up into the fells, enjoying the feeling of truly being off the beaten track and surrounded by forests and woodland. Popular amongst enthusiasts of outdoor pursuits the forest is brimming with opportunities for adventure, whilst those who prefer gentler activities will enjoy peaceful woodland walks and a trip to the café.

Tarn Hows2.82km from Beatrix Potter Gallery and Hawkshead

One of the beautiful spots that are most visited in Lakeland.  Its sheer beauty surrounded by thick woodland and views towards Wetherlam, the Helvellyn range, and the Langdale Pikes. Tarn Hows is fed at its northern end by a series of valley and basin mires and is drained by Tom Gill which cascades down over several small waterfalls to Glen Mary bridge: named by John Ruskin who felt that Tom Gill required a more picturesque name and so gave the area the title 'Glen Mary'.

National Trust - Hill Top3.18km from Beatrix Potter Gallery and Hawkshead

Hill Top is a 17th-century house in Near Sawrey near Hawkshead, in the English county of Cumbria. It is an example of Lakeland's vernacular architecture with random stone walls and slate roofs. The house was once the home of children's author and illustrator Beatrix Potter who left it to the National Trust. It is a Grade II* listed building.

Brantwood4.6km from Beatrix Potter Gallery and Hawkshead

Brantwood is a historical house, museum and centre for the arts, also offering a wedding venue and self-catering accommodation with views over Coniston. It was the home of John Ruskin, one of the greatest figures of the Victorian age. Ruskin was a poet, an artist, a critic, a social revolutionary and a conservationist.

Brockhole on Windermere, The Lake District Visitor Centre4.68km from Beatrix Potter Gallery and Hawkshead

Brockhole on Windermere, The Lake District Visitor Centre is a visitor centre and tourist attraction managed by the Lake District National Park Authority set in 30 acres of magnificent terraced gardens and grounds stretching down to the shore of Windermere lake, with splendid views of the surrounding countryside. The centre organises a number of activities, including orienteering, kayaking and open water swimming, as well as regular exhibitions.

Where is Beatrix Potter Gallery and Hawkshead

Discover more attractions in Cumbria, where Beatrix Potter Gallery and Hawkshead is located

Cumbria91 attractions

The largest and most widespread industry in Cumbria is tourism. The Lake District National Park alone receives some 15.8 million visitors every year.World-famous for its beautiful lakes and mountainous fells, carved out long ago by glaciers, the Lake District today is a playground for walkers and outdoor enthusiasts.