Catacombs of St. Callixtus in Lazio, Italy - get details, & find more attractions to visit nearby

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Catacombs of St. Callixtus

Via Appia Antica, 110/126, 00179 Roma RM, Italy

Iconic Buildings
Old Ruins

About Catacombs of St. Callixtus

The catacombs of St. Callixtus are among the greatest and most important of Rome. They originated about the middle of the second century and are part of a cemeterial complex that occupies an area of 90 acres, with a network of galleries about 12 miles long, in four levels, more than twenty meters deep. In it were buried tens of martyrs, 16 popes, and very many Christians.  The area of the catacomb proper is about fifteen hectares, and it goes down for five levels.


Attractions near Catacombs of St. Callixtus

Aurelian Walls1.53km from Catacombs of St. Callixtus

The Aurelian Walls in Rome was built in the third century A.D. and are about 19 kilometers long. Works began by Emperor Aurelian during a time of insecurity throughout Italy and the empire. It was originally constructed of tufa concrete, with a facing of triangular bricks.  It was originally constructed of tufa concrete, with a facing of triangular bricks.

Baths of Caracalla2.43km from Catacombs of St. Callixtus

One of the most beautiful and luxurious pubic baths in ancient Rome begun by the emperor Septimius Severus in AD 206.  There were three main bath chambers: the frigidarium, or cold room; the caldarium, or hot room; and the tepidarium, or lukewarm room.  There were also large open-air swimming pools. Marble was used lavishly, and sculpture, mosaics, frescoes, and other decorations ornamented the interior.

Basilica Papale San Paolo fuori le Mura2.66km from Catacombs of St. Callixtus

The largest church in Rome after St Peter’s, this vast basilica stands on the site where St Paul was buried after being decapitated in AD 67. The basilica is within Italian territory and not the territory of the Vatican City State. The interior of the Basilica of St. Paul is magnificent, with enormous marble columns and beautiful gold mosaics. On the basilica’s walls, visitors will be able to observe the portraits of each of the popes, while a ray of sunlight lights up the portrait of the curren

Pyramid of Caius Cestius2.89km from Catacombs of St. Callixtus

The Pyramid of Cestius was most likely built between 18 and 12 BC. The 36-meter high pyramid was built as a tomb for a wealthy Roman under the sway of all things Egyptian. It is a remarkable monument, made of white Carrara marble and exactly 100 Roman feet high. It stands at a fork between two ancient roads, the Via Ostiensis and another road that ran west to the Tiber along the approximate line of the modern Via Marmorata.

St. Clement Basilica3.3km from Catacombs of St. Callixtus

St. Clement Basilica is a minor basilica dedicated to Pope Clement I. This church is remarkable because archaeologically, it records the history of Rome from the beginning of Christianity up until the Middle Ages. This ancient church was transformed over the centuries from a private home and site of clandestine Christian worship in the first century to a grand public basilica by the 6th century, reflecting the emerging Roman Catholic Church's growing legitimacy and power.

Circus Maximus3.43km from Catacombs of St. Callixtus

The Circus Maximus was a chariot racetrack in Rome first constructed in the 6th century BCE. A U-shaped structure with seats on three sides and a low wall running down the middle of the arena around which the chariots raced. It was also used for other public events such as the Roman Games and gladiator fights and was last used for chariot races in the 6th century CE. In its fully developed form, it became the model for circuses throughout the Roman Empire. The site is now a public park.

Where is Catacombs of St. Callixtus

Discover more attractions in Lazio, where Catacombs of St. Callixtus is located

Lazio89 attractions

Lazio is one of the 20 administrative regions of Italy. Situated in the central peninsular section of the country, it has 5,864,321 inhabitants – making it the second most populated region of Italy – and its GDP of more than €197 billion per year means that it has the nation's second-largest regional economy. The capital of Lazio is Rome, which is also the capital and largest city of Italy.