Attractions to explore nearby Aventine Hill - With photos & details

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Attractions to explore nearby Aventine Hill

Aventine HillAventine Hill, 00153 Rome, Metropolitan City of Rome, Italy

The Aventine Hill is one of the seven hills on which Ancient Rome was built. The legend recounts that Romulus had the idea to build a city on the Palatine Hill and his brother Remus thought the Aventine Hill was the right place where to start construction of a city.  The Aventino is ringed with very important churches, monasteries, and the one thing tourists come to see while missing the rest: the Knights of Malta keyhole in Piazza dei Cavalieri di Malta.

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Giardino degli Aranci0.37 KMs away from Aventine Hill

Giardino degli Aranci is the name used to describe the park Savelli , a park of Rome of about 7,800 m², located on the hill Aventino , in the district Ripa , which offers an excellent view of the city. The garden, as it currently appears, was built in 1932 by the architect Raffaele De Vico. The park offers an excellent view of the city. It was constructed to offer public access to the view from the side of the hill, creating a new ‘’belvedere’’, to be added to the existing viewpoints in Rom

Mouth of Truth0.70 KMs away from Aventine Hill

The Mouth of Truth is nothing more than a manhole cover of the Cloaca Maxima. It was one of the most famous images of the Eternal City is this mysterious bearded male face, carved on a Pavonazzetto marble slab of about 1.75 metres in diameter which was located in the portico of the church of Santa Maria in Cosmedin, was intended as the depiction of a river deity.

Pyramid of Caius Cestius0.72 KMs away from Aventine Hill

The Pyramid of Cestius was most likely built between 18 and 12 BC. The 36-meter high pyramid was built as a tomb for a wealthy Roman under the sway of all things Egyptian. It is a remarkable monument, made of white Carrara marble and exactly 100 Roman feet high. It stands at a fork between two ancient roads, the Via Ostiensis and another road that ran west to the Tiber along the approximate line of the modern Via Marmorata.

Circus Maximus0.74 KMs away from Aventine Hill

The Circus Maximus was a chariot racetrack in Rome first constructed in the 6th century BCE. A U-shaped structure with seats on three sides and a low wall running down the middle of the arena around which the chariots raced. It was also used for other public events such as the Roman Games and gladiator fights and was last used for chariot races in the 6th century CE. In its fully developed form, it became the model for circuses throughout the Roman Empire. The site is now a public park.

Tiber Island0.89 KMs away from Aventine Hill

The Tiber Island is almost 300 X 70 meters, which the Romans referred to as “inter duos pontes” between the two bridges.  It seems most of its mass is owed to the formation of a sandbar, historically added to by the Romans, as an easier way to ford the Tiber River. The island is boat-shaped, approximately 270 meters wide, and has been connected with bridges to both sides of the river since antiquity.

Basilica of Our Lady in Trastevere1.02 KMs away from Aventine Hill

The Basilica of Our Lady in Trastevere is one of the oldest churches still standing in Rome. However, the majority of the building as we see it today was erected later, in the twelfth century AD. The inscription on the episcopal throne states that this is the first church in Rome dedicated to Mary, mother of Jesus.  The church has large areas of important mosaics from the late 13th century by Pietro Cavallini.

Marcello Theater1.07 KMs away from Aventine Hill

The theatre of Marcellus was the largest and most important theatre in Rome and completed in the late 1st century BCE during the reign of Augustus. The theatre had a capacity of between 15 to 20,500 spectators and its semicircular travertine façade originally had two tiers, each composed of 41 arches. Today its ancient edifice in the rione of Sant'Angelo, Rome, once again provides one of the city's many popular spectacles or tourist sites.

Palatine Hill1.12 KMs away from Aventine Hill

Palatine Hill is a four-sided plateau rising 131 feet south of the Forum in Rome and 168 feet above sea level. The site is now mainly a large open-air museum while the Palatine Museum houses many finds from the excavations here and from other ancient Italian sites. During the Republican Period, Roman citizens belonging to the upper class settled in this area and built sumptuous palaces, of which important traces are still preserved.

Capitoline Museums1.23 KMs away from Aventine Hill

The Capitoline Museums are the main civic museum of the city of Rome. The historical seat is constituted by the Palazzo dei Conservatori and the Palazzo Nuovo. The two buildings are located on the Campidoglio Square remodeled following the design of Michelangelo and are linked by the Galleria Lapidaria, an underground passage that crosses the Campidoglio Square without having to go outside the museums.

Roman Forum1.28 KMs away from Aventine Hill

The Roman Forum for centuries was the ancient Romans' point of reference in terms of the law, religion, and social life. Originally used as a necropolis, it was later the battle theatre of Lake Curzio, hosting combats between the Romans and Sabines. Such was documented by the Roman historian Livy. For centuries the Forum was the center of day-to-day life in Rome: the site of triumphal processions and elections; the venue for public speeches, criminal trials, and gladiatorial matches; and the nuc

Campidoglio1.28 KMs away from Aventine Hill

Campidoglio is also known as Monte Capitolino, is one of the seven hills on which Rome was founded. Its height is 48 m asl on the Arx, 35.9 m asl in the Asylum, and 44.7 m asl on the Capitolium proper. The Campidoglio is also the representative office of the municipality of Rome. According to the historian Tacitus, the Campidoglio, as well as the underlying Roman Forum, were added to the square Rome of Romulus by Tito Tazio.

Baths of Caracalla1.28 KMs away from Aventine Hill

One of the most beautiful and luxurious pubic baths in ancient Rome begun by the emperor Septimius Severus in AD 206.  There were three main bath chambers: the frigidarium, or cold room; the caldarium, or hot room; and the tepidarium, or lukewarm room.  There were also large open-air swimming pools. Marble was used lavishly, and sculpture, mosaics, frescoes, and other decorations ornamented the interior.

Campidoglio square1.29 KMs away from Aventine Hill

The Piazza del Campidoglio is a monumental square located on the top of the Campidoglio hill in Rome. It is in the highest of the seven hills of point Rome, the Capitoline Hill. Located between the Roman Forum and the Campus Martius, the Capitoline Hill is part of the origin of the Roman city, its ruins buried under several layers of medieval and Renaissance architecture being.

Arch of Titus1.29 KMs away from Aventine Hill

The Arch of Titus is a Roman Triumphal Arch which was erected by Domitian in c. 81 CE at the foot of the Palatine hill on the Via Sacra in the Forum Romanum, Rome. It commemorates the victories of his father Vespasian and brother Titus in the Jewish War. The arch is also a political and religious statement expressing the divinity of the late emperor Titus.

Septimius Severus Arch1.30 KMs away from Aventine Hill

The Arch of Septimius Severus, erected in 203 CE, stands in Rome and commemorates the Roman victories over the Parthians in the final decade of the 2nd century CE. It is arguably the most impressive monument on the Forum Romanum. Although the statues on the top of the arch are now lost, the reliefs have lost their painting, and two reliefs are almost illegible, the monument as a whole is very well-preserved.

Arch of Constantine1.34 KMs away from Aventine Hill

The Arch of Constantine is an arch in Rome, found between the Colosseum and the Palatine Hill. It was built in honor of Constantine I's victory over Maxentius at the Battle of Milvian Bridge on October 28, 312. It is the latest of the triumphal arches in Rome. The arch is also a tour de force of political propaganda, presenting Constantine as a living continuation of the most successful Roman emperors, renowned for their military victories and good government.

Spada Gallery1.39 KMs away from Aventine Hill

The Spada Gallery is housed in the 16th century Capodiferro Palace, which is undoubtedly one of the most beautiful and representative buildings of Mannerist architecture in the city of Rome. The Gallery has four rooms and a beautiful collection of Baroque paintings created during the 17th century by Cardinals Bernardino and Fabrizio Spada.

Imperial Forum1.41 KMs away from Aventine Hill

The Imperial Forums in Rome include a series of monumental piazzas built between 46 B.C.E. and 113 A.D. They are considered to have been the hub of Ancient Rome’s political activities, and they were eventually accompanied by other structures over the course of centuries. . These fora were the centers of politics, religion, and economy in the ancient Roman Empire.

Altar of the Fatherland1.42 KMs away from Aventine Hill

The majestic Altar of the Fatherland is the emblem of Italy in the world, a symbol of change, of the Risorgimento and of the Constitution. It was built in 1885 by Umberto I of Savoy, son of Vittorio Emanuele II, first King of Italy. One of the iconic buildings in this area which is famous among tourists. This white marble building, 81 meters high, hides many allegorical meanings that geographically represent the whole of Italy.

Via dei Fori Imperiali1.43 KMs away from Aventine Hill

The Via dei Fori Imperiali is a road in the centre of the city of Rome.  It runs in a straight line from the Piazza Venezia to the Colosseum. There has been a great deal of archeological excavation on both sides of the road, as significant Imperial Roman relics remain to be found underneath it.